Dbytes #366 (14 February 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

There has been an “unfathomable predilection for secrecy. That is the bane of good science and an obstacle to the democratic and informed design and improvement of public policy”
Murray-Darling Basin Royal Commission Report

[and see item 3]

In this issue of Dbytes

1. ‘You throw your hands up in horror’: Lack of action on recovery plans leaves Tasmanian animals at risk, inquiry hears
2. WMO confirms past 4 years were warmest on record
3. Failure of environmental Water Flows in the Murray-Darling Basin: Observed versus expected
4. ‘We won’: Landmark climate ruling as NSW court rejects coal mine
5. ‘Wiped out before our eyes’: Hawaii offers bold plan to stop shark killings
6. Conservation groups press world leaders to protect 30% of the planet
7. Climate change is killing off Earth’s little creatures

-~<>~-

1. ‘You throw your hands up in horror’: Lack of action on recovery plans leaves Tasmanian animals at risk, inquiry hears

https://www.examiner.com.au/story/5892848/tales-of-despair-at-faunal-extinction-hearings-in-tasmania/

-~<>~-

2. WMO confirms past 4 years were warmest on record

Geneva, 6 February 2019: In a clear sign of continuing long-term climate change associated with record atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 have been confirmed as the four warmest years on record. A consolidated analysis by the World Meteorological Organization of five leading international datasets showed that the global average surface temperature in 2018 was approximately 1.0° Celsius (with a margin of error of ±0.13°C) above the pre-industrial baseline (1850-1900). It ranks as the fourth warmest year on record.

https://public.wmo.int/en/media/press-release/wmo-confirms-past-4-years-were-warmest-record

[And see New Climate Council Report: Weather Gone Wild
https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/new-climate-council-report-weather-gone-wild/ ]

-~<>~-

3. Failure of environmental Water Flows in the Murray-Darling Basin: Observed versus expected

The Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists has conducted a study to fill a gap in publicly available research that evaluates whether environmental water recovery has led to observable increases in river flows at two key sites along the Murray-Darling Basin; Chowilla and Wilcannia. These sites were chosen as they are representative of the health of the southern and northern basins respectively. This study was undertaken to assess whether recovered water is contributing to increased flows as would be expected. 

This assessment found that despite 2,016 GL of water being recovered for the environment (63% of that envisaged under the Basin Plan) at a cost of $8.5 billion, and during the relatively wet period from 2010-2018: 1. Environmental flow targets set by the Murray-Darling Basin Authority, which are required to be met to produce environmental improvements, have failed to be achieved. 2. In general, excluding natural flood events, annual average flows can be up to 40% to 60% smaller than expected under the Basin Plan.  3. In general, observed flows are similar to, or less than, the baseline (pre-Basin Plan) model results, revealing that instead of an increase there has actually been no improvement or even a decline in water flows since the implementation of the Basin Plan.

https://wentworthgroup.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/02/MDB-flows-summary.pdf

-~<>~-

4. ‘We won’: Landmark climate ruling as NSW court rejects coal mine
[Recommended by Richard Beggs]

Last week the NSW Land and Environment Court rejected the appeal by Gloucester Resources to overturn the NSW government decision not to grant permission for its Gloucester coalmine. The original decision was based on visual impacts and zoning regulations. Judge Brian Preston’s reasons for rejecting the appeal at the Land and Environment Court, however, included Australia’s responsibilities under the Paris climate agreement. He said, “It matters not that the aggregate of the project’s greenhouse gas emissions may represent a small fraction of the global total……..The global problem of climate change needs to be addressed by multiple local actions to mitigate emissions by sources and remove greenhouse gases by sinks.” He mentioned both the carbon impact emissions of the mine’s construction and operation, and those from burning the coal.

https://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/we-won-landmark-climate-ruling-as-nsw-court-rejects-coal-mine-20190207-p50wer.html

[and see The win to stop the Rocky Hill
coalmine happened in the right place and just in time
]

-~<>~-

5. ‘Wiped out before our eyes’: Hawaii offers bold plan to stop shark killings

Proposed law would protect any shark or ray in state waters and be first of its kind in US

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/feb/08/hawaii-law-shark-ray-ban-ocean?CMP=Share_AndroidApp_Tweet

-~<>~-

6. Conservation groups press world leaders to protect 30% of the planet

Thirteen nature conservation organizations are urging world leaders to back a plan to protect 30 percent of the world’s surface and oceans by 2030. Recent research has shown that less than a quarter of the world’s wilderness still remains. The group released a statement as negotiators were meeting in Japan to begin drafting a plan to meet that goal.

https://news.mongabay.com/2019/02/conservation-groups-press-nations-to-protect-30-of-the-earth/

-~<>~-

7. Climate change is killing off Earth’s little creatures

Climate change gets blamed for a lot of things these days: inundating small islands, fueling catastrophic fires, amping-up hurricanes and smashing Arctic sea ice.

But a global review of insect research has found another casualty: 40% of insect species are declining and a third are endangered. It confirms what many have been suspecting: in Australia and around the world, arthropods – which include insects, spiders, centipedes and the like — appear to be in trouble.

https://theconversation.com/climate-change-is-killing-off-earths-little-creatures-109719

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt

Advertisements

Dbytes #365 (7 February 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“I want you to feel the fear I feel every day. And act as if your house is on fire. Because it is.”
Teenage Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg at the World Economic Forum meeting in Davos, at the end of January.
[And see item 3]

In this issue of Dbytes

1. Priority Threat Management for biodiversity conservation: A handbook
2. Feral brumby culls found by scientists to be crucial in ensuring survival of native ecosystems
3. The Global Risks Report from the World Economic Forum
4. Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change
5. Queensland Citizen Science strategy
6. Calls for emergency action plan as myrtle rust pushes plants to extinction
7. State of the Apes: Infrastructure Development and Ape Conservation

-~<>~-

1. Priority Threat Management for biodiversity conservation: A handbook

From (lead author) Josie Carwardine: We do not have enough time, money or space to manage all threats to biodiversity. A generic, flexible and fairly straightforward solution to help with this challenge is provided in a new paper out this month in the Journal of Applied Ecology. The approach, called Priority Threat Management (PTM), is designed to gather the best available information and logically prioritise efforts and funds so that they are spent in a way that maximises benefits to biodiversity, through strategically abating key threats.

The paper ‘Priority Threat Management for biodiversity conservation: a handbook’ gives step by step guidance for working through the process, including defining goals and objectives; bringing together key people and information on biodiversity, threats and management; designing management strategies to address key threats and estimating their costs, benefits and feasibility; and prioritising strategies to understand which are likely to provide the greatest returns for biodiversity for the resources spent. Underpinning these steps in the PTM process is effective two-way communication amongst key stakeholders, established from the outset of the project and culminating in the integration of management priorities into existing initiatives for implementation.

The Priority Threat Management process can help answer key questions, such as:
• What are the most important threats to reduce to ensure species persistence?
• Which threat management strategies offer the best value for money in terms of saving the most species?
• What is the outlook for biodiversity under a range of management scenarios?
• How much resources do we need to ensure all species persist across a region?

-~<>~-

2. Feral brumby culls found by scientists to be crucial in ensuring survival of native ecosystems

A meta-analysis of ecological studies from around the world found that feral horses are the single largest cause of widespread environmental degradation throughout alpine parks.

-~<>~-

3. The Global Risks Report from the World Economic Forum (Davos, January 2019)

“Of all risks, it is in relation to the environment that the world is most clearly sleepwalking into catastrophe,” the report warns.

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2019/01/these-are-the-biggest-risks-facing-our-world-in-2019

-~<>~-

4. Losing Earth: The Decade We Almost Stopped Climate Change
By Nathaniel Rich (NY Times)
[Recommended by James Dickson-Hoyle]

The world has warmed more than one degree Celsius since the Industrial Revolution. The Paris climate agreement — the nonbinding, unenforceable and already unheeded treaty signed on Earth Day in 2016 — hoped to restrict warming to two degrees. The odds of succeeding, according to a recent study based on current emissions trends, are one in 20. If by some miracle we are able to limit warming to two degrees, we will only have to negotiate the extinction of the world’s tropical reefs, sea-level rise of several meters and the abandonment of the Persian Gulf. The climate scientist James Hansen has called two-degree warming “a prescription for long-term disaster.” Long-term disaster is now the best-case scenario. Three-degree warming is a prescription for short-term disaster: forests in the Arctic and the loss of most coastal cities. Robert Watson, a former director of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, has argued that three-degree warming is the realistic minimum. Four degrees: Europe in permanent drought; vast areas of China, India and Bangladesh claimed by desert; Polynesia swallowed by the sea; the Colorado River thinned to a trickle; the American Southwest largely uninhabitable. The prospect of a five-degree warming has prompted some of the world’s leading climate scientists to warn of the end of human civilization.

Is it a comfort or a curse, the knowledge that we could have avoided all this? Because in the decade that ran from 1979 to 1989, we had an excellent opportunity to solve the climate crisis. The world’s major powers came within several signatures of endorsing a binding, global framework to reduce carbon emissions — far closer than we’ve come since. During those years, the conditions for success could not have been more favorable. The obstacles we blame for our current inaction had yet to emerge. Almost nothing stood in our way — nothing except ourselves…

[Editor’s note: this NY Times story is 31,000 words long but well worth the time]

-~<>~-

5. Queensland Citizen Science strategy
[Recommended by Jessie Oliver]

A strategy for Engaging Queenslanders in Science was developed by the Office of the Queensland Chief Scientist in 2016 to fulfil the vision of creating a Queensland population that engages in and recognises, supports and advocates for science. The Queensland Citizen Science strategy (PDF, 3.7M) was developed to support this vision and encourage Queenslanders to be aware of and participate in citizen science projects.

-~<>~-

6. Calls for emergency action plan as myrtle rust pushes plants to extinction

Experts say some members of ‘enormously important’ myrtle family could be extinct within five years, with others to follow

-~<>~-

7. State of the Apes: Infrastructure Development and Ape Conservation

Infrastructure development in Africa and Asia is expanding at breakneck speed, especially in biodiversity-rich developing nations. This trend reflects governments’ efforts to promote economic growth in response to increasing populations, rising consumption rates and persistent inequalities. Large-scale infrastructure development is regularly touted as a way to meet the growing demand for energy, transport and food—and as a key to poverty alleviation. In practice, however, road networks, hydropower dams and “development corridors” tend to adversely affect local populations, natural habitats and biodiversity. Such projects typically weaken the capacity of ecosystems to maintain the ecological functions on which wildlife and human communities depend. These effects are compounded by the challenges that developing nations face as a result of climate change.

The entire book—and it’s an exceptionally good one, authoritative and beautifully illustrated—can be freely downloaded here, in several languages.

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt

Dbytes #364 (31 January 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“Events like the Menindee fish kill bring home the cost of treating the environment as a cultural battleground. The culture warriors’ policy amounts to listening to what scientists say we need to do, then doing the opposite. This is a guaranteed route to global disaster.”
John Quiggin in The Darling River fish kill is what comes from ignoring decades of science
[And see item 5]

-~<>~-

In this issue of Dbytes

1. OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Australia 2019
2. Adani threatens largest known flock of endangered finches

3. ‘We are clearly losing the fight’: scientists sound alarm over invasive species
4. Professional kangaroo population control leads to better animal welfare, conservation outcomes and avoids waste
5. The Productivity Commission issued ‘Murray-Darling Basin Plan: Five-year assessment report’
6. The meaning of environmental words matters in the age of ‘fake news’
7. Why can’t we agree on fixing the Environment?

-~<>~-

1. OECD Environmental Performance Reviews: Australia 2019

“Australia has managed to decouple economic growth from the main environmental pressures and has made impressive progress in expanding protected areas. However, it is one of the most resource- and carbon-intensive OECD countries, and the state of its biodiversity is poor and worsening. Advancing towards a greener economy will require strengthening climate-change policy and mainstreaming biodiversity more effectively across sectors.”

http://www.oecd.org/australia/oecd-environmental-performance-reviews-australia-2019-9789264310452-en.htm

-~<>~-

2. Adani threatens largest known flock of endangered finches

Adani’s proposed Carmichael Coal Mine in central Queensland could destroy the last major habitat of the endangered black-throated finch, a new report has warned. An independent review has been ordered by the Queensland government into Adani’s management plan for the finches’ habitat, after the federal government waved through the environmental approval for the site.

https://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/queensland/adani-threatens-largest-known-flock-of-endangered-finches-20190129-p50uer.html

-~<>~-

3. ‘We are clearly losing the fight’: scientists sound alarm over invasive species

Research published in September in the Pacific Conservation Biology journal revealed that invasive pests are the No 1 threat to Australia’s most at-risk species – above climate change, land clearing or energy production.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jan/21/we-are-clearly-losing-the-fight-scientists-sound-alarm-over-invasive-species

-~<>~-

4. Professional kangaroo population control leads to better animal welfare, conservation outcomes and avoids waste

From George Wilson: “we have just published on kangaroo welfare and conservation in Australian Zoologist. In it we discuss the consequences of allowing kangaroo populations to grow unchecked, regardless of the carrying capacity or other uses of the lands they occupy. As the drought bites, populations are crashing, leading to very poor outcomes in animal welfare, land degradation and resource wastage. Our paper suggests alternative ways to manage kangaroos and address current problems. We argue that better kangaroo welfare depends on more not less professional population control and recognition of their true value.”

http://publications.rzsnsw.org.au/doi/pdf/10.7882/AZ.2018.043

-~<>~-

5. The Productivity Commission issued ‘Murray-Darling Basin Plan: Five-year assessment report’

One of it’s key points: “The complex challenges ahead have been made more difficult because of the way Basin Governments have approached the implementation of the Plan. The process has lacked transparency and candour with stakeholders.”

https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/basin-plan/report

-~<>~-

6. The meaning of environmental words matters in the age of ‘fake news’
[The Conversation]

Power can be expressed through environmental buzzwords. They are used to influence policy direction, funding and produce norms that become entrenched in their meaning around the world. Motivated by this idea, our recent research explores the meaning of three environmental buzzwords — resilience, sustainability and transformation. Meaning influences the way we understand environmental problems and shapes the solutions we prioritize — or don’t.

https://theconversation.com/the-meaning-of-environmental-words-matters-in-the-age-of-fake-news-106050

-~<>~-

7. Why can’t we agree on fixing the Environment?
Of tribalism and short-termism, and other diabolical drivers of disagreement

“The major parties of the political Left and the Right are really coalitions of groups with overlapping world views. Labor is a coalition of unionised labour and social progressives, while the Coalition includes ‘small l’ liberals, social conservatives, free market fundamentalists, regional interests and even libertarians. Different pressures have more or less traction with different groups within these coalitions and some of these pressures combine to drive opposition to comprehensive action on the environment…”
Peter Burnett

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/2019/01/29/why-cant-we-agree-on-fixing-the-environment/

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt

Dbytes #363 (23 January 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“We should rethink the way we prioritize conservation to recognize the critical role that small, isolated patches play in conserving the world’s biodiversity. Restoring and reconnecting small isolated vegetation patches should be an immediate conservation priority.”
Wintle et al (2019)

In this issue of Dbytes

1. What experts think caused the death of a million Menindee fish
2. Discover Australia’s marine parks
3. 2018 was the hottest on record for the world’s oceans
4. A Highway Megaproject Tears at the Heart of New Guinea’s Rainforest
5. Scenarios and models to support global conservation targets
6. The Caribbean Needs Tourism, and Tourism Needs Healthy Coral Reefs
7. Sustainability and ‘big government’

-~<>~-

1. What experts think caused the death of a million Menindee fish

“The big question is: why was the river in such a state that a blue-green algae outbreak of this scale could occur? Here’s what four experts working in the fields of river ecology, policy, management and economics told us…”

ABC News

-~<>~-

2. Discover Australia’s marine parks

Parks Australia recently launched the Australian Marine Parks Science Atlas — an interactive online platform with fascinating maps, videos, images and data on our 58 Australian Marine Parks. The Science Atlas provides key facts about each park, including the role that science has played in establishing the park, and showcases recent research highlights.

https://atlas.parksaustralia.gov.au/amps

-~<>~-

3. 2018 was the hottest on record for the world’s oceans

Scientists have confirmed that 2018 was the hottest on record for the world’s oceans. “The data tells us that the past five years have been the hottest on record for our oceans. It is clear evidence of global warming. Oceans absorb more than 90 percent of the heat trapped by greenhouse gases,” said the Climate Council’s acting CEO, Dr Martin Rice. “Warmer oceans store more energy, which fuels more intense storms. Warmer waters also expand, which causes sea levels to rise. This threatens lives as well as coastal infrastructure,” said Dr Rice.

https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/a-sunburnt-country-and-a-cruel-sea/

[and if you’re interested in record-breaking weather see 2018: Year of Extreme Weather; something record breaking happened each month
https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/2018-year-of-extreme-weather/ ]

-~<>~-

4. A Highway Megaproject Tears at the Heart of New Guinea’s Rainforest
By William Laurance, January 17, 2019

The Indonesian government is building a 2,700-mile road network on the island of New Guinea, opening up some of the world’s last great tropical rainforests to development and threatening unique indigenous cultures. Can international pressure force Indonesia to scale back this megaproject?

https://e360.yale.edu/features/a-highway-megaproject-tears-at-the-heart-of-papuas-rainforest

-~<>~-

5. Scenarios and models to support global conservation targets

Scenarios and models offer a powerful opportunity to improve the setting and implementation of targets, but there is limited evidence of such use beyond their role in global agenda-setting. In this new paper, Nicholson and colleagues aimed to create a guide that clearly sets out the potential uses of models and scenarios in this capacity, framed within the four stages of the policy cycle.

Scenarios are depictions of possible futures and alternative actions that could influence progress toward conservation targets.

Models are simplified representations of a system (such as biodiversity) and can describe or predict conservation outcomes under different possible scenarios.

The paper explains that together, models and scenarios can project the impacts of different actions and even targets on biodiversity, providing information necessary for decision-makers to understand potential advantages and disadvantages of different options.

Ref: Citation: Nicholson, E., Fulton, E.A., Brooks, T.M., Blanchard, R., Leadley, P., Metzger, J.P., Mokany, K., Stevenson, S., Wintle, B.A., Woolley, S.N.C., Barnes, M., Watson, J.E.M. & Ferrier, S. (2018) Scenarios and models to support global conservation targets. Trends in Ecology and Evolution.
https://www.cell.com/trends/ecology-evolution/fulltext/S0169-5347(18)30251-9

-~<>~-

6. The Caribbean Needs Tourism, and Tourism Needs Healthy Coral Reefs

AI and social media are helping quantify the economic value of coral reefs

https://www.nature.org/en-us/what-we-do/our-insights/perspectives/the-caribbean-needs-tourism–and-tourism-needs-healthy-coral-ree/?src=social.nature.twitter.main

-~<>~-

7. Sustainability and ‘big government’
[From Sustainability Bites]

“the ‘idea’ of climate change is an existential threat to the ideology of free market fundamentalism (and Libertarianism). If we as a society acknowledge the clear and present danger of climate change (and the need for a deep and systemic response) then we are also acknowledging the need for bigger government and for greater constraints on our personal freedoms (in order to tackle climate change).”
David Salt

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/2019/01/21/sustainability-and-big-government/

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt

Dbytes #362 (17 January 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“Tragically, after the Basin Plan was adopted in 2012, governments led by NSW withdrew their funding for the Sustainable River Audit program… … It is outrageous that $13 billion in public funds are being spent to restore environmental health without any effective, basin-wide monitoring.”
Jamie Pittock, The Canberra Times

In this issue of Dbytes

1. Impacts of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems on conservation policy and practice
2. Protected Planet World Database on Protected Areas
3. Crisis in our national parks: how tourists are loving nature to death
4. More than 50 Australian plant species face extinction within decade
5. Options for ‘renovating’ nature under climate change
6. Three Tips for Tracking Animals with Drones
7. Environmental sustainability: a thoroughly Conservative notion

-~<>~-

1. Impacts of the IUCN Red List of Ecosystems on conservation policy and practice
[Blog by Lucie Bland (includes a link to the paper)]

“…the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN, the world’s largest conservation organisation) adopted in 2014 new global criteria to list threatened ecosystems. Nearly five years on, we used an impact evaluation framework to identify the impacts of the Red List of Ecosystems on conservation. This enabled us to identify the real-world impacts of our research beyond contributions to academic knowledge. It also allowed us to celebrate the IUCN’s 70th anniversary in style!

Using the evaluation framework, we found that the Red List of Ecosystems has already had some great outcomes and impacts over the last five years. To date, 1,397 ecosystems have been assessed in 100countries. Countries that used disparate methods to assess their ecosystem are now using the Red List of Ecosystems (e.g., South Africa and Finland). Other countries are developing their first Red Lists (e.g., Colombia and Chile) and reaping the conservation benefits

Countries with ecosystem red lists are using them to inform legislation, land-use planning, protected area expansion, reporting, and ecosystem management. For example, in Australia, the assessment of the Coastal Upland Swamps as Endangered influenced legal protection and government recommendations for changes to the design of proposed mines. In many countries, the presence of threatened ecosystems acts as direct regulatory triggers for legal protection and changes to land-use planning.

https://conservationscience.org.au/2019/01/10/new-paper-impacts-of-the-iucn-red-list-of-ecosystems-on-conservation-policy-and-practice/

-~<>~-

2. Protected Planet World Database on Protected Areas

Protected Planet is the most up to date and complete source of information on protected areas, updated monthly with submissions from governments, non-governmental organizations, landowners and communities. It is managed by the United Nations Environment World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) with support from IUCN and its World Commission on Protected Areas (WCPA). It is a publicly available online platform where users can discover terrestrial and marine protected areas, access related statistics and download data from the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA).

https://protectedplanet.net/

-~<>~-

3. Crisis in our national parks: how tourists are loving nature to death

As thrill seekers and Instagrammers swarm public lands, reporting from eight sites across America shows the scale of the threat.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/nov/20/national-parks-america-overcrowding-crisis-tourism-visitation-solutions?CMP=share_btn_link

-~<>~-

4. More than 50 Australian plant species face extinction within decade

More than 50 Australian plant species are under threat of extinction within the next decade, according to a major study of the country’s threatened flora. Just 12 of the most at-risk species were found to be listed as critically endangered under national environment laws – the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act – and 13 had no national threatened listing at all. The scientists behind the research, published in the Australian Journal of Botany this month, say the results point to a need for re-evaluation of Australia’s national lists for threatened plants.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/26/more-than-50-australian-plant-species-face-extinction-within-decade?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

-~<>~-

5. Options for ‘renovating’ nature under climate change

Changes in Earth’s climate are accelerating, prompting increasing calls to ensure that investments in ecological restoration and nature conservation accommodate such changes. To acknowledge this need, we propose the term “ecological renovation” to describe ecological management and nature conservation actions that actively allow for environmental change. To evaluate and progress the development of ecological renovation and related intervention options in a climate change context, we reviewed the literature and established a typology of options that have been proposed. We explored how these options address emerging principles underpinning climate‐adapted conservation goals and whether the balance of approaches reflected in our typology is likely to be sufficient given expected rapid rates of climate change. Our typology recognizes a matrix of 23 intervention option types arranged on the basis of underpinning ecological mechanisms (“ameliorate changing conditions” or “build adaptive capacity”) on one axis, and the nature of the tools used to manipulate them (“low regrets” or “climate targeted”) on the other. Despite a burgeoning literature since 2008, we found that the majority of effort has consistently focused on low‐regrets adaptation approaches that aim to build adaptive capacity. This is in many ways desirable, but a paradigm shift enabling greater attention to climate‐targeted approaches is likely to be needed as climate change accelerates. When assessed against five emerging principles for setting nature conservation goals in a changing climate, only one option type could deliver to all five, and we identified a conflict between climate‐targeted options and “wildness” values that calls for deeper evaluation. Importantly, much of the inference in the 473 reviewed studies was drawn from ecological reasoning and modeling, with only 16% offering new empirical evidence. We also noted significant biases toward North America and Europe, forest ecosystems, trees, and vertebrates. To address these limitations and help shift the paradigm toward humans as “renovators” rather than “restorers” of a prior world, we propose that ecological researchers contribute by (1) informing societal discourse toward adapting nature conservation goals to climate change, (2) adjusting and upscaling conservation planning to accommodate this suite of climate‐adapted goals, and (3) reconceptualizing experimental approaches to increase empirical evidence and expedite innovation of tools to address change.

Ref: Prober et al (2019). Shifting the conservation paradigm: a synthesis of options for renovating nature under climate change. Ecol Monographs
https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ecm.1333

-~<>~-

6. Three Tips for Tracking Animals with Drones
[From Wildlife Drones]

“…amidst all the benefits that drones bring, their potential to affect animals has prompted a discussion on the need for drone operators to adopt more wildlife-conscious flying practices. This is because current drone laws mainly concern the protection of people and infrastructure, rather than wildlife and their habitats. However an example of where drone laws do take wildlife into consideration is the Australian National Parks and Wildlife Regulation which provides whale and dolphin viewing guidelines, where drones are recognised as being equivalent to manned aircraft…”

https://wildlifedrones.net/2019/01/14/3-tips-for-tracking-animals-with-drones/

-~<>~-

7. Environmental sustainability: a thoroughly Conservative notion
[From Sustainability Bites]

“The greatest obstacle to progress on policy is the polarisation of political views on the environment. In modern discourse, we have become so used to associating environmental concern with the political Left that we’ve lost sight of the fact that caring for the environment, especially when seen through a sustainability lens, is actually a fundamentally conservative idea.”
Peter Burnett

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/2019/01/14/environmental-sustainability-a-thoroughly-conservative-notion/

Editor’s note: If you’re interested in the connection between Conservative politics and conservation outcomes then you might also be interested in this story from the Decision Point archives: Communicating environmental science to Conservatives

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt

Dbytes #361 (19 December 2018)

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decisions Group

A message to subscribers: Dbytes in 2019
For the past several years Dbytes has been sponsored by CEED (before that, support was also provided by AEDA and NERP ED). Funding for CEED finishes in 2018. In 2019, I will continue to produce Dbytes under its own banner. The first few issues in 2019 will likely come out from the same mailchimp mail list. Dbytes will continue to have a focus on biodiversity conservation and decision making, but it will carry no node news (as the CEED network will no longer exist).
I have received many kind emails over the years from Dbyte subscribers telling me how much they value Dbytes. Thank you for your support. I hope I can continue to provide that value in the months and years ahead.
This is the final issue of Dbytes for 2018. Look after yourself over the Xmas break.
Regards
David

“A good decision for the environment is one that is transparent, efficient and effective; that came about with real stakeholder engagement and support; that enables learning; and something that serves as a stepping stone to even better decisions down the line.”
Decision Point #107 [see item 1]

General News

1. The biggest issue of Decision Point ever!
2. The Value of Natura 2000
3. Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy
4. Beef-eating ‘must fall drastically’ as world population grows
5. ‘Monitoring and evaluating the social and psychological dimensions that contribute to privately protected area program effectiveness

EDG Node News

UM Node: Brendan Wintle and Sarah Bekessy on the small patch of bush over your back fence might be key to a species’ survival
RMIT Node: Alex Kusmanoff, Matthew Selinske, Georgia Garrard and Sarah Bekessy host a workshop at RMIT on ‘Connecting and acting for nature’
UQ Node: Mainstreaming of ecosystem services as a rationale for ecological restoration in Australia
UWA Node: Heterogeneous public preference for REDD+ projects under different forest management regimes
ANU Node: David Lindenmayer on ‘Native forest logging agreement [RFSs] raises accountability issues’

-~<>~-

General News

1. The biggest issue of Decision Point ever!

The final issue of Decision Point for 2018 has just been released – issue #107. It’s 64 pages long and contains nine chapters on the many dimensions of good environmental decision making (written by CEED CIs). Themes covered include decision analysis, building models, prioritising investments, valuing information, adaptive management, long-term monitoring, influencing policy, marine collaboration and the social dimensions of decision science.

As always, it’s free. You can download the whole issue (what a fabulous gift for your loved ones!!) or simply visit the story of your interest. It’s all available at Decision Point Online at http://decision-point.com.au/

[Editor’s note: Funding for CEED ends in 2018 but plans are being made for a couple of legacy issues of Decision Point in 2019 to cover CEED research still coming out.]

-~<>~-

2. The Value of Natura 2000

The Natura 2000 network encompasses nearly a fifth of EU territory and provides protection for over two hundred habitat types and more than a thousand rare and threatened species. The benefits to people provided by the network are estimated to be worth €223-314 billion per year. This Future Brief explores the ‘value’ of Natura 2000 from different angles: in terms of biodiversity conservation, the benefits for people, and economic value.

http://ec.europa.eu/environment/integration/research/newsalert/pdf/value_of_natura_2000_FB12_en.pdf

-~<>~-

3. Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy

Citizen Science: Innovation in Open Science, Society and Policy was recently released by by UCL Press. By reaching out far and wide, and providing a set of 31 chapters that cover different issues in the interface between citizen science, open science, social innovation, and policy, it aims to create a useful volume that can serve the different audiences that are interested in citizen science. The book is free to download.

https://www.ucl.ac.uk/ucl-press/browse-books/citizen-science

-~<>~-

4. Beef-eating ‘must fall drastically’ as world population grows

Current food habits will lead to destruction of all forests and catastrophic climate change by 2050, report finds

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/05/beef-eating-must-fall-drastically-as-world-population-grows-report?CMP=share_btn_tw

-~<>~-

5. ‘Monitoring and evaluating the social and psychological dimensions that contribute to privately protected area program effectiveness

Privately protected areas (PPAs) make important contributions towards global conservation goals. As with any protected area, PPAs must be monitored for effectiveness at protecting and managing biodiversity. However, the key drivers of maintaining and improving the effectiveness of PPAs are often social, particularly for conservation covenants and easements that are owned and managed by private landholders. In Australia, we surveyed 527 covenant landholders across three states (New South Wales, Tasmania, and Victoria), to provide a benchmark for monitoring and evaluation activities. We found that landholders are mainly motivated to participate in order to protect their land in perpetuity, but come to expect financial and technical assistance as a benefit of the program. While 71.1% (n = 344) reported achieving their land management goals, 44.7% (n = 242) of landholders struggle with covenant management because of age, and financial and time constraints. Covenant landholders are generally satisfied with the program (92%). A subset (8%) of landholders feels disaffected with their participation, relating to their perceived inability to personally manage the biodiversity on their land, and the lack of interaction they have with representatives of covenanting organizations. Where compliance monitoring and semi-annual technical assistance is limited, some landholders are concerned that the efficacy of the covenant is reduced. To increase effectiveness we suggest that PPA programs regularly monitor landholder satisfaction and management needs, schedule conservation actions based on landholder capacity, and utilize landholder networks to spread information and foster communities of stewardship. Additionally, given the older demographics of landholders, programs should engage in PPA successional planning.

Ref: Matthew J. Selinske, Natasha Howard, James A. Fitzsimons, Mathew J. Hardy, Kate Smillie, James Forbes, Karen Tymms, Andrew T. Knight (2019). Monitoring and evaluating the social and psychological dimensions that contribute to privately protected area program effectiveness. Biological Conservation 229: 170-178,
Free download available from this link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0006320717321353?dgcid=coauthor

-~<>~-

EDG News

UM Node: Brendan Wintle and Sarah Bekessy on the small patch of bush over your back fence might be key to a species’ survival
“The small patch of bush over your back fence might be key to a species’ survival. A recent article in The Conversation, based on a paper appearing in PNAS, highlights the inordinately important role of small, isolated patches of vegetation for biodiversity conservation. Brendan Wintle at The University of Melbourne led this global analysis which found that the smaller and more isolated a vegetation patch, the more likely it is to have a high conservation priority. The key implications of the work are that we need to avoid policies that make it easy to clear small and isolated patches; we need to actively manage the threats to such places such as weeds and other feral pests; and invest in restoring, expanding and reconnecting those patches in a thoughtful way. It also has significance for conserving our urban green spaces, as The Conversation article highlights: https://theconversation.com/the-small-patch-of-bush-over-your-back-fence-might-be-key-to-a-species-survival-108672. PNAS paper found here: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/12/05/1813051115” 

RMIT Node: Alex Kusmanoff, Matthew Selinske, Georgia Garrard and Sarah Bekessy host a workshop at RMIT on ‘Connecting and acting for nature’
The workshop brought together key policy officers (from SA, NSW and Vic) and researchers (RMIT) to share collective knowledge and explore the gaps and challenges around government policies and programs that seek to promote public engagement with nature. In particular the workshop soughtto develop a greater understanding of the knowledge and the gaps around developing connections to nature in a way that also leads people to act for nature.

UQ Node: Mainstreaming of ecosystem services as a rationale for ecological restoration in Australia
Conservation biology and restoration ecology have historically focused on promoting biodiversity and safeguarding endangered species. However, the ecosystem services (ES) concept has given these fields a new, anthropocentric rationale: promoting human wellbeing. Here we investigate how the ES concept has penetrated decision making and public support for ecological restoration in Australia, by examining the national government’s funding priorities, land managers’ project goals, and the public’s willingness to pay for restoration. We find that national funding priorities and local project implementation have thoroughly mainstreamed the ES concept, and that the public is generally supportive of ES goals. More than half of projects awarded funding, and two-thirds of land managers’ implemented projects, had explicit ES goals. Among managers who participated in semi-structured interviews, 45% rated ES aims as at least as important as biodiversity aims in their projects. The public was more willing to donate to a restoration scenario that included ES than one that did not, and 41% of the public chose an ES as the preferred outcome of restoration. Across all groups, provisioning services were the least preferred ES outcome, compared to regulating or cultural services. Our results indicate that ES are now important rationales for restoration funding and implementation.
Ref: Matzek, V., K.A. Wilson, and M. Kragt. 2018. Mainstreaming of ecosystem services as a rationale for ecological restoration in Australia. Ecosystem Services. Volume 35, February 2019, Pages 79-86. doi: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2018.11.005

UWA Node:
Heterogeneous public preference for REDD+ projects under different forest management regimes
Successful implementation of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+) projects depends on active support and participation by local households. It has been suggested that households’ support for REDD+ could be influenced by their socio-economic conditions, their experience with REDD+ projects and local forest management regimes. However, there has been little information about the effect of such contextual factors on public preference for REDD+ projects. Using a choice experiment survey in Indonesia, this paper examines heterogeneity on household preferences for REDD+ projects among three distinct forest management regimes: private, government, and community. We found that respondents in community regime are the most supportive for REDD+ projects whereas those in private regime are the least supportive. Current REDD+ interventions also have heterogeneous impacts on household preferences across forest management regimes. Added restrictions on forest-dependent livelihoods under REDD+ projects is the biggest concern of participating households; however, we note that involving households in decision-making and distributing REDD+ benefit for community projects could create a supportive environment for REDD+ projects. Female respondents from households with larger family size and limited land ownership are more likely to support REDD+ projects. These findings provide useful insights to design more targeted REDD+ projects.
Ref: Rakatama, A., Pandit, R., Iftekhar, M. S., Ma, C. (2018). Heterogeneous public preference for REDD+ projects under different forest management regimes. Land Use Policy, 78: 266-277. ISI Impact Factor: 3.194. Ranking (Environmental Studies) 25/108 (Q1). Rating: A. doi: 10.1016/j.landusepol.2018.07.004

ANU Node: David Lindenmayer on ‘Native forest logging agreement [RFSs] raises accountability issues’
“For Professor Lindenmayer, who had been researching forest ecology for decades, the heart of the matter was the lack of a comparative value analysis on native forests. “It doesn’t take into account their value as water, water production, it doesn’t value forests for their carbon storage value, and it certainly doesn’t value forests for their biodiversity, conservation, biology value,” he said. He was concerned that terms such as obligation had been removed from the agreement. “Which suggests to me that essentially what’s happening is the State Government is looking at ways to avoid being taken to court over some of these potential transgressions of logging impacts on biodiversity species, such as long-footed potoroos or koalas and other groups of animals and plants,” he said.
ABC News

-~<>~-

About Dbytes
Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. It is edited and distributed by David Salt. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

About EDG
The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG receives support from the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). You can find out about the wonderful work of CEED by reading its magazine, Decision Point (which, as it happens, is also produced by David Salt).

Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

Dbytes #360 (13 December 2018)

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decisions Group

“People have a strong tendency to avoid making difficult decisions, and as a result, they are prone to accepting whatever default option they are presented with—even when this option is not in their own, or society’s, best interest. This status quo bias means that if people are asked to opt into a conservation program voluntarily (such as choosing electricity generated from renewables), they most likely won’t, even if they think it is a good idea.”
Josh Cinner, Science

General News

1. The bird and the businessman: A billionaire developer’s plan to build on a protected wetland
2. How the neoliberal obsession with valuing nature changes our understanding of it
3. The feasibility of commercially harvesting agile wallabies in the Northern Territory
4. Inquiry on the impact on the agricultural sector of vegetation and land management policies, regulations and restrictions
5. Environmental impact assessments aren’t protecting the environment

EDG Node News

ANU Node: David Lindenmayer and colleagues on the road to oblivion – quantifying pathways in the decline of large old trees
RMIT Node: Local government support for private land conservation
UQ Node:
Kerrie Wilson and colleagues on concern about threatened species and ecosystem disservices underpin public willingness to pay for ecological restoration
UWA Node: Identifying the causes of low participation rates in conservation tenders

-~<>~-

General News

1. The bird and the businessman: A billionaire developer’s plan to build on a protected wetland

It’s only 30 kilometres east of Brisbane but the economic gap between Cleveland and the Queensland capital is massive. Now an influential developer wants to revitalise the coastal town by building a $1.4 billion precinct on the foreshore. There’s just one problem: the region’s wetlands are protected under an international treaty known as the Ramsar convention. So who prevails in a battle between birdlife and business?

https://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/backgroundbriefing/the-bird-and-the-businessman/10588700

And see the story Calls for inquiry into protected Queensland wetlands development assessment, https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/06/calls-for-inquiry-into-protected-queensland-wetlands-development-assessment?CMP=share_btn_tw

-~<>~-

2. How the neoliberal obsession with valuing nature changes our understanding of it

https://theconversation.com/how-the-neoliberal-obsession-with-valuing-nature-changes-our-understanding-of-it-103366

-~<>~-

3. The feasibility of commercially harvesting agile wallabies in the Northern Territory
Agrifutures Australia

This research is the first of its type to investigate the economics, biophysical, and policy frameworks and standards that might surround an industry based on the commercial harvest of this species of macropod.

https://www.agrifutures.com.au/product/the-feasibility-of-commercially-harvesting-agile-wallabies-in-the-northern-territory/

-~<>~-

4. Inquiry on the impact on the agricultural sector of vegetation and land management policies, regulations and restrictions

On Wednesday, 5 December 2018, the Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, the Hon. David Littleproud MP, asked the Committee to inquire into and report on the impact on the agricultural sector of vegetation and land management policies, regulations and restrictions.

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/House/Standing_Committee_on_Agriculture_and_Water_Resources/Landpolicyimpacts

Why are we having this enquiry? Federal Agriculture Minister David Littleproud said this following the recent catastrophic fires in north Queensland:

“We need to have a real look at the impact of the Queensland Labor Government’s native vegetation management land management practices.

“The idea a farmer is too scared to make a proper firebreak is a joke. We need an easy process so this can be done to protect us from fires. Departments need to be clear and quick when responding to landholders on this.

“The absence of proper firebreaks on both public and private land is just dumb.

“Has the Queensland Government done enough to make sure fires don’t spread from National Parks onto farms? Have Queensland’s vegetation management laws left more fuel load on farms?”

-~<>~-

5. Environmental impact assessments aren’t protecting the environment

Too many EIAs are failing to stop environmental calamaties. Here’s what we need to do.
https://ensia.com/voices/environmental-impact-assessment/

-~<>~-

EDG News

ANU Node: David Lindenmayer and colleagues on the road to oblivion – quantifying pathways in the decline of large old trees
Large old trees are critical structures in Mountain Ash forest. We quantified pathways of decay and collapse in populations of large old trees. Large tree decline was affected by time, stand age and site and landscape level fire. Tree decline was slowest and trees were less decayed in old growth forest. Protection of large trees and old growth stands is critical in wood production forest.
Ref: Lindenmayer, D.B., Blanchard, W., Blair, D., and McBurney, L. (2018). The road to oblivion – quantifying pathways in the decline of large old trees. Forest Ecology and Management, 430, 259-264.

RMIT Node: Local government support for private land conservation
Mat Hardy, Ben Cooke, Matthew Selinske and colleagues hosted a workshop at RMIT University on Thursday 29 November entitled “Local government support for private land conservation in rapidly developing peri-urban and regional areas”. The natural heritage values of many peri-urban and regional areas in Australia are under increasing threat from urban encroachment and development. Some private landholders in these areas elect to protect natural values on their land by entering into voluntary permanent protection agreements (covenants) with land trusts and government agencies, foregoing their rights to development and helping to retain the natural values of these areas. Some local governments are highly supportive of these agreements, providing rebates and discounts on land rates for participating landholders, working as an incentive for landholders to sign up to conservation covenants or similar agreements. Yet, other councils provide little or no support for conservation landholders. Why this discrepancy exists is currently unclear. Drawing from the experience and knowledge of participants from local government, their peak bodies, and conservation agencies, the workshop aimed to develop a framework for a national survey and interview schedule investigating support for private land conservation at the local government level. The survey and interviews will support the focus of the research, uncovering why local governments provide support (or not), how decisions about the granting of support (or not) have been made, and the types of support that is provided. The resultant survey is now under development to be then distributed nationally, helping conservation agencies and local governments to identify opportunities and conditions for the application of local government support for private land conservation, and how existing barriers can be overcome.

UQ Node: Kerrie Wilson and colleagues on c
oncern about threatened species and ecosystem disservices underpin public willingness to pay for ecological restoration
A collaboration of CEED authors have investigated public preferences for ecological restoration revealed through environmental valuation studies that aim to measure willingness to pay. Respondents’ environmental views will often influence the conclusions drawn from such studies. They conducted a national survey of perceptions of the benefits and perverse outcomes arising from ecological restoration using a dichotomous choice payment card. Using interval regression to estimate willingness to pay, they find that there are respondents who will perceive mostly biodiversity benefits from restoration, with a particular interest in threatened species recovery. They find that this eco‐centric view of the benefits of restoration also increases the dollar amount that respondents are willing to pay to support restoration activities. A proportion of respondents also perceive restoration as having negative impacts, with concerns orientated towards increased fire, decreased farmland productivity, and groundwater availability. Perceptions of the potential effects of restoration on land productivity had a significant negative influence on the amount of money respondents were willing to pay. These findings are useful for targeting outreach in order to garner public support for ecological restoration.
Ref: Wilson, K. A., Davis, K. J., Matzek, V. and Kragt, M. E. (2018). Concern about threatened species and ecosystem disservices underpin public willingness to pay for ecological restoration.  Restoration Ecology. doi:10.1111/rec.12895. Available for free via https://rdcu.be/bbhIN

UWA Node: Identifying the causes of low participation rates in conservation tenders
Conservation tenders are being used as a policy mechanism to deliver environmental benefits through changes in land, water and biodiversity management. While these mechanisms can potentially be more efficient than other agri-environmental and payment for ecosystem service schemes, a key limitation in practice is that participation rates from eligible landholders are often low, limiting both efficiency and effectiveness. In this paper we document and review potential causes of low participation in two categories: those that treat participation as an adoption issue focused on searching for the landholder, farm or practice characteristics that limit participation; and those that treat it as an auction design issue, looking for the different auction, contract or transaction cost elements that limit landholder interest in participation. We then model how landholders make choices to engage and bid in a tender, making three important contributions to the literature on this topic. First, we document the low participation rates in conservation tenders, mostly across developed countries, an issue that has received little attention to date. Second, we explain that a decision to participate in a conservation tender involves three simultaneous decisions about whether to change a management practice, whether to be involved in a public or private program with contractual obligations, and how to set a price or bid. Third, we explain that there are a number of factors that affect each stage of the decision process with some, such as landholder attitudes and risk considerations, relevant to all three. Our findings suggest that decisions to participate in a conservation tender are more complex than simple adoption decisions, involving optimisation challenges over a number of potentially offsetting factors.
Ref: Rolfe, J., Schilizzi, S., Boxall, P., Latacz-Lohmann, U., Iftekhar, M. S., Star, M., O’Connor, P., 2018. Identifying the causes of low participation rates in conservation tenders. International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, 12(1): 1-45. doi: 10.1561/101.00000098

-~<>~-

About Dbytes
Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. It is edited and distributed by David Salt. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

About EDG
The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG receives support from the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). You can find out about the wonderful work of CEED by reading its magazine, Decision Point (which, as it happens, is also produced by David Salt).

Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/