Dbytes #110 (23 July 2013)

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group

“A decade is the minimum possible timeframe for meaningful assessments of climate change. WMO’s report shows that global warming was significant from 1971 to 2010 and that the decadal rate of increase between 1991-2000 and 2001-2010 was unprecedented.”

Michel Jarraud, Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).
See item 6.
General News

1. Reef Plan 2013 and Reef Report Card 2011 released
2. Just how bad are coastal weeds? Assessing the geo-eco-psycho-socio-economic impacts
3. The Climate Institute issued an assessment of the climate policies of parties and Independents.
4. Essential Biodiversity Variables
5. The critical decade 2013 [electronic resource] : climate change science, risks and responses
6. The WMO issued ‘The Global Climate 2001-2010, A Decade of Climate Extremes’

1. Reef Plan 2013 and Reef Report Card 2011 released

The Australian and Queensland Governments endorsed the Reef Water Quality Protection Plan 2013 at the Great Barrier Reef Ministerial Forum in July. Reef Plan’s primary focus continues to be addressing diffuse source pollution from broadscale land use.

The Great Barrier Reef Report Card 2011 measures progress from 2009 towards Reef Plan’s goals and targets. It assesses the combined results of all Reef Plan actions up to June 2011.

http://www.reefplan.qld.gov.au/index.aspx

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2. Just how bad are coastal weeds? Assessing the geo-eco-psycho-socio-economic impacts
Australia’s coastal regions are being threatened by many invasive plants. This RIRDC project attempts, for the first time, to collate existing information on the impacts of these invaders, collects new data on impacts on animals and people, and identifies the gaps in our knowledge and reporting systems.
https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/items/13-032

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3. The Climate Institute issued an assessment of the climate policies of parties and Independents.

Electoral policies of both major political parties leave Australians unprepared for costly climate impacts and offer a mixed bag on pollution reductions and low carbon investment.

http://www.climateinstitute.org.au/articles/media-releases/major-parties-expose-australia-to-climate-risks-pollute-o-meter-2013.html/section/1482

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4. Essential Biodiversity Variables

The Group on Earth Observations Biodiversity Observation Network (GEO BON) is leading the development of a set of Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs). GEO BON partners are developing (and seeking consensus around) EBVs that could form the basis of monitoring programs worldwide.

GEO BON invites anyone who would like to get involved in EBV development, to take the EBV survey which will run till 31 August 2013. The survey will help us gauge how respondents feel about current candidate EBVs and provides respondents with the opportunity to make suggestions for new/alternative EBVs.

More info on EBVs (and a link to the survey): http://www.earthobservations.org/geobon_ebv.shtml

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5. The critical decade 2013 [electronic resource] : climate change science, risks and responses
Will Steffen and Professor Lesley Hughes

Two years ago in its report ‘The Critical Decade: Climate science, risks and responses’, the Climate Commission stated that this decade, 2011-2020, is the decade to decisively begin the journey to decarbonise our economy, thereby reducing the risks posed by climate change. One quarter of the way through the critical decade we present here an update of our current knowledge of climate change – the scientific evidence, the risks to our communities and the responses required to prevent significant harm.

http://climatecommission.gov.au/wp-content/uploads/The-Critical-Decade-2013_medres_web.pdf

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6. The WMO issued ‘The Global Climate 2001-2010, A Decade of Climate Extremes’

http://www.wmo.int/pages/mediacentre/press_releases/pr_976_en.html
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