Dbytes #111 (30 July 2013)

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group

“A national survey has found that the science literacy of young Australian adults has fallen in the last three years, with just two-thirds correctly identifying the time it takes for the Earth to travel around the sun, compared with three-quarters in 2010.”
Australian Academy of Science [see http://www.science.org.au/news/media/17july13.html]

General News

1. Climate Adaptation Outlook Report

2. Revegetation helps fix the climate, but Australia would rather clear land
3. Struggling to keep up? Six coping strategies [for academics]
4. Improving Integration of Agriculture and Conservation through Biosphere Reserves
5. How will species respond to how we adapt to climate change
6. New biodiversity fund in New South Wales

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General News

1. Climate Adaptation Outlook Report

The Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education has released Climate Adaptation Outlook: A Proposed National Adaptation Assessment Framework.

This is the first report in a series on how well-placed Australia is to manage the impacts of unavoidable climate change. The report sets out a proposed framework for assessing Australia’s adaptation progress.
You can access the report on the department’s website at http://www.climatechange.gov.au/climate-change/adapting-climate-change/climate-adaptation-outlook.

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2. Revegetation helps fix the climate, but Australia would rather clear land
A Conversation editorial by Andrew Campbell

“This week the Treasurer announced cuts of $213m to the Biodiversity Fund and $144m to the Carbon Farming Initiative — at face value a big set back for landscape restoration.

State governments seem to be losing interest in revegetation, and several states (notably Queensland and Victoria) are weakening land clearing controls.”

https://theconversation.com/revegetation-helps-fix-the-climate-but-australia-would-rather-clear-land-16164

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3. Struggling to keep up? Six coping strategies [for academics]
A blog by Joern Fischer [recommended by Karin Ikin]

“Academic lives are busy, and those in early career-stage (e.g. tenure track) are often hit hardest. Following from a discussion I had earlier today, I thought I’d share my favourite coping strategies more broadly.”

http://ideas4sustainability.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/struggling-to-keep-up-six-coping-strategies/

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4. Improving Integration of Agriculture and Conservation through Biosphere Reserves

This report provides a range of strategies to improve integration between agriculture and conservation in a biosphere reserve. The research gathered information from international case studies and evaluated their local relevance in discussions with a range of people with an interest in the Fitzgerald Biosphere Reserve in Western Australia. The participants included farmers, conservationists, agricultural scientists and natural resource managers.

https://rirdc.infoservices.com.au/items/13-022
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5. How will species respond to how we adapt to climate change
An op ed by James Watson (associate researcher with EDG, UQ)

We’ve been asking the wrong questions about conservation. Stop worrying about how species will respond to climate change – focus on how our adaptations are going to affect them
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2013/jul/29/conservation-climate-change-species

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6. New biodiversity fund in New South Wales

A new biodiversity fund in New South Wales will make it easier for the construction industry to provide vital infrastructure. A biodiversity offsets fund will be established to enable major projects to contribute money, rather than locating and purchasing sites themselves. [And one of the dot points on the changes notes the changes will enable: “the ability for offset calculations to be discounted where significant social and economic benefits accrue to NSW as a result of a proposal”]

http://www.enviroinfo.com.au/boost-for-biodiversity-in-new-south-wales/

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