Dbytes #112 (6 August 2013)

Dbytes #112 (6 August 2013)
Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group

“Far better an approximate answer to the right question, which is often vague, than an exact answer to the wrong question, which can always be made precise.”
John Tukey

General News

1. Applying Landscape Science to Natural Resource Management
2. Science into policy: taking part in the process
3. Henry Schapper Fellowship (WA Visiting Fellowships)
4. Increasing the resilience of the Australian alpine flora to climate change and associated threats: a plant functional traits approach
5. SNAP: Science for Nature and People call for Working Group Proposals.
6. A new method for evaluating threats to soil biodiversity

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General News

1. Applying Landscape Science to Natural Resource Management

The March 2013 edition of Ecology and Society, Vol 18(1), focuses on ‘Applying Landscape Science to Natural Resource Management’. The special feature draws on nine examples from Australia to illustrate how landscape science seeks to integrate information from diverse sources to generate management solutions for implementation by individual land managers, communities, and governments at different levels. One of the examples was co-authored by Chris Raymond, LaP and ED NERP Hubs (A Tool and Process that Facilitate Community Capacity Building and Social Learning for Natural Resource Management.)

http://www.ecologyandsociety.org/issues/view.php?sf=60

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2. Science into policy: taking part in the process

This UK publication pulls a number of science-policy communication/integration threads together in one document. Recommended by Ross Rowe, the Knowledge Integrator from the LaP NERP Hub

http://www.nerc.ac.uk/publications/corporate/documents/science-into-policy.pdf

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3. Henry Schapper Fellowship (WA Visiting Fellowships)

The WA Branch of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society is pleased to announce that it will be offering an annual Visiting Fellowship in honour of the late Henry Schapper. The successful applicant will receive $2000 from WA AARES to visit WA for a short period. The fellow will undertake to share their knowledge with WA researchers during their visit, with a view to forming future collaborations. Nominations are welcome from leading researchers in fields relevant to economic and ecological sustainability.

It is a requirement that the nominee identifies a WA AARES member as a collaborator to help coordinate their visit. Interested applicants can contact the WA AARES Branch Secretary (Katrina Davis, katrina.davis@uwa.edu.au) for assistance.

Further details can be found at: http://www.aares.org.au/AARES/Honours_and_Awards/Henry_Schapper_Fellowship.aspx

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4. Increasing the resilience of the Australian alpine flora to climate change and associated threats: a plant functional traits approach

Is now published on the NCCARF website.
Pickering, C, & Venn, S, 2013 Increasing the resilience of the Australian flora to climate change and associated threats: a plant functional traits approach National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility, Gold Coast, pp. 94.

http://www.nccarf.edu.au/publications/increasing-resilience-australian-flora-climate-change

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5. SNAP: Science for Nature and People call for Working Group Proposals.

This is a new scientific collaboration by NCEAS, The Nature Conservancy and Wildlife Conservation Society.
Deadline for proposals is 9 September
https://www.nceas.ucsb.edu/snap/rfp

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6. A new method for evaluating threats to soil biodiversity

Little is known about the organisms that live within soil, although they play a vital role in the biological processes that support life on Earth. In a recent study, researchers calculated the relative risk of pressures caused by human activity on soil biodiversity in the EU, showing that intensive land use has the greatest impact.

Source: Gardi, C., Jeffery, S., Saltelli, A. (2013) An estimate of potential threats to soil biodiversity in the EU. Global Change Biology. 19(5): 1538–1548. DOI: 0.1111/gcb.12159

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About Dbytes
Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David Salt (David.Salt@anu.edu.au). Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. Also, email David if you want to unsubscribe (or subscribe someone else). While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

About EDG
The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG is jointly funded by the Australian Government’s National Environmental Research Program (NERP) and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence program (CEED).

CEED: http://ceed.edu.au/
NERP ED: http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/
EDG: http://www.edg.org.au/

EDG major events: http://www.edg.org.au/events.html
Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

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