Dbytes #129 (3 December 2013)

Dbytes #129 (3 December 2013)
Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group

“Research shows that the number of attacks per million people in Australia almost halved from approximately 60 per million people between 1930/1939 to approximately 30 per million people between 2000/2009.”
Ryan Kempster and Shaun Collins on shark attacks (grist for the mill if you’re involved in any discussions on shark culls, see the Conversation http://theconversation.com/how-to-prevent-shark-attacks-20890)

General News

1. Quantifying carbon sequestration by permanent native mixed species environmental or mallee plantings
2. Cattle grazing does not reduce fire severity in eucalypt forests and woodlands of the Australian Alps
3. Quick Guide for Constructing Regional Scale Environmental Asset Condition Accounts
4. Inaugural Nancy Mills Medal
5. Hate journal impact factors? Try Google rankings instead

EDG News
(more details on these items follows general news)

Canberra: 2013/14 Summer Scholars have arrived
Perth: David Pannell discusses seven strategies for increasing environmental benefits
Melbourne: Hannah Pearson asks: What the hell is a woodland bird anyway?
Brisbane
: Patricia Sutcliffe et al. (2012) received the best student paper award

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General News

1. Quantifying carbon sequestration by permanent native mixed species environmental or mallee plantings

methodology proposal is open for public consultation until 7 January 2014.

 

The methodology proposes to generate abatement from the sequestration of carbon dioxide from the permanent plantings of native tree species. Abatement is calculated using output data from the Full Carbon Accounting Model (FullCAM).

http://www.climatechange.gov.au/reducing-carbon/carbon-farming-initiative/methodologies/methodology-proposals/quantifying-carbon-sequestration-permanent-native-mixed-species-environmental-or-mallee-plantings

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2. Cattle grazing does not reduce fire severity in eucalypt forests and woodlands of the Australian Alps
(from the LaP Hub Happenings)

Grant Williamson’s (Vegetation and Fire) recent publication in Austral Ecology is bound to raise a few eyebrows: on both sides of the alpine fence…if the weekend’s media is anything to go by. Grant’s paper provides evidence that Cattle grazing does not reduce fire severity in eucalypt forests and woodlands of the Australian Alps., yet the Weekend Australia reports that the Victorian Government has again referred an application for grazing in the high country for consideration to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act for assessment. Grant’s article, co-written with NERP researchers David Bowman (Landscapes and Policy Hub and Brett Murphy (Environment Decisions Hub) is only available through subscription to Austral Ecology, or direct from the authors. For more information, visit the hub website or catch The Conversation companion article: ‘New research shows alpine grazing does not reduce blazing’.

http://theconversation.com/new-research-shows-alpine-grazing-does-not-reduce-blazing-20705

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3. Quick Guide for Constructing Regional Scale Environmental Asset Condition Accounts

Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists report
Seven Steps for Constructing Environmental Asset Condition Accounts

The purpose of creating environmental accounts is to enable society to take practical action to maintain healthy and productive land, freshwater and marine resources. This Quick Guide provides an overview of the steps required to construct, at a regional (landscape) scale, an environmental asset condition account.

http://wentworthgroup.org/2013/11/quick-guide-for-constructing-regional-scale-environmental-asset-condition-accounts/2013/

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4. Inaugural Nancy Mills Medal

The Australian Academy of Science is proud to announce that nominations are now open for the Inaugural Nancy Millis Medal, which recognises outstanding research and exceptional leadership by early- to mid-career Australian women who have established independent research in the natural sciences.

 

A Fellow of the Academy, the late Professor Millis introduced fermentation technologies to Australia, created the first applied microbiology course taught at an Australian university, and co-wrote the standard text Biochemical Engineering. Professor Millis also worked tirelessly to establish links between universities and industry.

 

The award is restricted to candidates who are normally a resident in Australia and for research conducted mainly in Australia.

 

Nomination details and guidelines can be found here – http://www.science.org.au/awards/awards/millis.html

 

Deadline for nominations is 10 February 2014.

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5. Hate journal impact factors? Try Google rankings instead
A ConservationBytes blog (recommended by Anna Renwick)

“A lot of people hate journal impact factors (IF). The hatred arises for many reasons, some of which are logical. For example, Thomson Reuters ISI Web of Knowledge® keeps the process fairly opaque, so it’s sometimes difficult to tell if journals are fairly ranked. Others hate IF because it does not adequately rank papers within or among sub disciplines. Still others hate the idea that citations should have anything to do with science quality (debatable, in my view). Whatever your reason though, IF are more or less here to stay.”

http://conservationbytes.com/2013/11/18/hate-journal-impact-factors-try-google-rankings-instead/#more-10817

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EDG News

Canberra: 2013/14 Summer Scholars have arrived
Last week two NERP summer scholars (also ANU summer scholarship students) commenced their work with the Department of the Environment. William Chen (graduate university of Sydney), is working with the department’s ERIN team investigating species outlier detection methods for modelling threatened species occurrence in the landscape. Lottie Boardman (graduate, University of Canterbury), will be working with Parks Australia to apply science-based methodologies to characterise the Australian National Living Collection (at the Australian National Botanical Gardens). A big thank you to their department mentors – Judy West, Belinda Brown, Zoe Knapp, Tony Rosling, Simon Bennett and Marcus Baseler, and their ANU supervisors – Don Driscoll, Emma Burns and Jenny Pierson.

Perth: David Pannell discusses seven strategies for increasing environmental benefits
“It is obvious that the budgets of our public environmental programs are small relative to the cost of fixing all of our environmental problems. If we want to achieve greater environmental benefits from our public investments, what, in broad terms, are the options?
http://www.pannelldiscussions.net/2013/12/259-increasing-environmental-benefits/

Melbourne: Hannah Pearson asks: What the hell is a woodland bird anyway?
“I will be going to the EcoTas 13 conference next week and am excited to share my poster with you here in preparation. I have been looking into consistency in ecological research recently, specifically with reference to woodland birds. I attempted to include them in my masters research but was frightened away because I couldn’t find a definitive definition or list of them. Now I’ve gone back and had a look at this more closely and you might be interested in my results.”
http://hpearsonresearch.wordpress.com/2013/11/23/what-the-hell-is-a-woodland-bird-anyway-ecotas13-poster/

Brisbane: Patricia Sutcliffe et al. (2012) received the best student paper award
at the Marine Biodiversity Hub’s annual meeting. She received it for her paper on ‘Biological surrogacy in tropical seabed assemblage fails’ (Ecological Applications 22(6):1762-1771) for “a very thorough analysis that shows us taxonomic shortcuts won’t do it”.

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About Dbytes
Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David Salt (David.Salt@anu.edu.au). Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. Also, email David if you want to unsubscribe (or subscribe someone else). While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

About EDG
The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG is jointly funded by the Australian Government’s National Environmental Research Program (NERP) and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence program (CEED).

CEED: http://ceed.edu.au/
NERP ED: http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/
EDG: http://www.edg.org.au/

EDG major events: http://www.edg.org.au/events.html
Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

 

 

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