Dbytes #166 (16 September 2014)

 Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group

“Recovery plans act as a strategic mechanism to attract and focus funding rather than as a funding document themselves.”
Part of Government Response to Senate report on threatened species protection [see item 1]

General News

1. The effectiveness of threatened species and ecological communities’ protection in Australia – the Government response

2. Priority assessment list of threatened species, ecological communities and key threatening processes now published

3. Review of Commonwealth marine reserves begins

4. State laws cannot protect environment to Commonwealth standard

5. Conservation Letters is going Open Access

EDG News

Brisbane: Richard Fuller on conservation and open access journals
Canberra: Phil Gibbons discusses the NSW biodiversity fund on ABC Rural Radio
Perth: Diana Prada joins CEEP
Melbourne: A carbon code of conduct is not enough

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General News

1. The effectiveness of threatened species and ecological communities’ protection in Australia – the Government response to the Senate Committee enquiry into threatened species protection. http://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Environment_and_Communications/Completed_inquiries/2010-13/threatenedspecies/index#

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2. Priority assessment list of threatened species, ecological communities and key threatening processes now published

The Finalised Priority Assessment List (FPAL) has now been published by DotE for the assessment period beginning 1 October 2014. It is the list of nominated species, ecological communities and key threatening processes that have been approved for assessment by the Minister responsible for the EPBC Act for a particular assessment year (1 October–30 September). These have a statutory timeframe in which the assessment must be completed. http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/assessments/fpal

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3. Review of Commonwealth marine reserves begins

“It is important that an independent review based on science is undertaken which reconsiders zoning boundaries to restore community confidence,” said Minister Hunt. http://www.environment.gov.au/minister/hunt/2014/mr20140911a.html

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4. State laws cannot protect environment to Commonwealth standard

A new report shows no state or territory is up to the task of implementing national environment laws. The report was commissioned by the ‘Places you love alliance’ a coalition of 42 Australian environment groups. http://www.acfonline.org.au/news-media/media-release/new-analysis-shows-state-laws-cannot-protect-environment-commonwealth

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5. Conservation Letters is going Open Access

[From Andrew Knight, a CEED PI’s at Imperial College]
Conservation Letters is going Open Access come 1st January 2015, fully inclusive of our back issues. We’ll also be initiating non-English Abstracts for articles in the very near future. We’ll keep trying to do our bit to make the best science available to all. [Editor’s note: Why is it important that conservation science be open access? See Richard Fuller’s paper on the topic below in Brisbane news.]

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EDG News

Brisbane: Richard Fuller on conservation and open access journals
The message from Richard: “Our new paper shows that only 9% of conservation science papers are freely downloadable and only 5% are fully open access This compares poorly with evolutionary biology, where a whopping 32% of papers are freely downloadable!! This is bad for implementing conservation because Jess Walsh recently showed that providing summaries of published evidence to conservationists changes what they say they will do 46% of the time! http://bit.ly/1lQLKSP We discuss some remedies in an editorial accompanying our paper at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cobi.12356/abstract” Reference FULLER, R. A., LEE, J. R. and WATSON, J. E. M. (2014), Achieving Open Access to Conservation Science. Conservation Biology. doi: 10.1111/cobi.12346 http://t.co/dEGDHb457v

Canberra: Phil Gibbons discusses the NSW biodiversity fund on ABC Rural Radio
“An academic [Phil Gibbons] who helped develop the native vegetation regulations in New South Wales says the state’s new biodiversity fund has potential, but is has too many loopholes. The NSW Government announced the scheme on Monday which allows developers to pay into a fund instead of creating an environmental offset themselves and maintaining it in perpetuity. Dr Phil Gibbons from the Australian National University advised the Federal Government on its environmental offsets policy and the International Union for the Conservation of Nature on their biodiversity policy. He says the NSW scheme may not stop the ongoing loss of biodiversity.”Just putting a side an existing patch of vegetation is not a gain…” http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-09-08/nsw-biodiversity-offsets/5727074

Perth: Diana Prada joins CEEP
Diana Prada, a CEED supported PhD student, has recently joined the Centre for Environmental Economics and Policy team. Diana’s research entitled “Conservation and Society: a balancing act” will look at the integration of socio-economic aspects into environmental protection programs.

Melbourne: A carbon code of conduct is not enough
By Hannah Pearson, Chris Baker, Natalie Briscoe, Laura Pollock and Luke Kelly.
Despite our best efforts, scientists haven’t succeeded in persuading the world’s governments that reducing carbon emissions is vital for maintaining a liveable climate on earth. This might be because we damage our credibility by creating more carbon emissions than average citizens. This isn’t exactly the best way to show how much we value reducing carbon emissions and minimising climate change. Favaro (2014) highlighted this issue and proposed a way of reducing scientists’ carbon emissions by going through a carbon-ethics application procedure before undertaking research-related activities. This idea is based around the principles underpinning animal research which require you to minimise and justify the suffering of animal subjects” http://qaeco.com/2014/09/04/a-carbon-code-of-conduct-is-not-enough/ [Editor’s note: And check out the interesting discussion that follows.]

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About Dbytes Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David Salt (David.Salt@anu.edu.au). Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. Also, email David if you want to unsubscribe (or subscribe someone else). While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

 

About EDG The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG is jointly funded by the Australian Government’s National Environmental Research Program (NERP) and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence program (CEED). CEED: http://ceed.edu.au/ NERP ED: http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/ EDG: http://www.edg.org.au/

EDG major events: http://www.edg.org.au/events.html Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

 

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