Dbytes #167 (23 September 2014)

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group

“Rounding up and shipping out horses has had its chance as a management strategy, and it has failed completely. The result is that our iconic Kosciuszko National Park is under an accelerating path of degradation, while at the same time, thousands of horses face prolonged suffering and death in the wild.” Don Driscoll and Sam Banks (see Canberra news)

General News

1. Cost Recovery under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

2. Dept of the Environment issued information on the marine reserves review.

3. Dept of Environment issued a draft recovery plan for white-bellied and orange-bellied frogs in WA.

4. CSIRO: Global carbon dioxide emissions reached 36 billion tonnes in 2013

5. The Parliamentary Library issued a Bill Digest for the Carbon Farming

EDG News


Canberra: Don Driscoll & Sam Banks write about cannibal horses and managing brumbies in the high country
Perth: The view from Caroline’s window
Melbourne:
Alex Kusmanoff’s new survey on framing information
Brisbane:
Kerrie Wilson wins the SCOPUS Young Researcher Award for the Life and Biological Sciences.

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General News

1. Cost Recovery under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

From 1 October 2014 the Australian Government will commence cost recovery arrangements for environmental assessments and some strategic assessments under the EPBC Act. These arrangements are consistent with the Australian Government Cost Recovery Guidelines which establishes that those who create the need for regulation should incur the costs, rather than the costs being borne by the wider community.

http://www.environment.gov.au/epbc/cost-recovery

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2. Dept of the Environment issued information on the marine reserves review.

The Commonwealth Marine Reserves Review is underway following the setting aside of the management plans that were scheduled to come into effect in July 2014. http://www.marinereservesreview.gov.au/

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3. Dept of Environment issued a draft recovery plan for white-bellied and orange-bellied frogs in WA.

http://www.environment.gov.au/resource/white-bellied-and-orange-bellied-frogs-geocrinia-alba-and-geocrinia-vitellina-recovery-plan

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4. CSIRO: Global carbon dioxide emissions reached 36 billion tonnes in 2013

Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels reached a new record of 36 billion tonnes last year. At the same time, the pace of emissions from burning fossil fuels continues to grow at a high rate. Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of the 2014 report CSIRO’s Dr Pep Canadell said the carbon dioxide level was “unprecedented in human history”. Dr Canadell said fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions are projected to increase 2.5 per cent this year, bringing the total carbon dioxide emissions from all sources above 40 billion tonnes. ” http://www.csiro.au/Portals/Media/Global-carbon-dioxide-emissions.aspx

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5. The Parliamentary Library issued a Bill Digest for the Carbon Farming Initiative Amendment Bill 2014.

[Editor’s note: A Bill Digest is a straightforward guide to a Bill that is about to be debated. (A Bill is a suggestion for new or changed legislation; if it’s passed it becomes an Act.) So the Digest should tell the reader what the Bill is intended to do, why and how, and discuss interested parties, unintended features of the Bill, pros and cons, etc. The library has a team of lawyers who work with subject specialists to write each ‘Digest’. The library produce Bills Digests primarily for parliamentarians to read before debate in the chamber, but they also publish them so that the general public can see them – e.g. lawyers/judges can find them useful. Thanks to Roger Beckmann from the Parliamentary Library for this explanation. Anyone interested in the whole carbon farming initiative will find this document fascinating.]

http://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/search/display/display.w3p;query=Id%3A%22legislation%2Fbillsdgs%2F3372556%22

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EDG News

Canberra: Don Driscoll & Sam Banks write about cannibal horses and brumbies in the high country [Editor’s note: This Conversation editorial is grim, sensational and compelling; and a must read to anyone wanting to influence conservation debates.] The grim story of the Snowy Mountains’ cannibal horses At Dead Horse Gap we encountered three brumbies standing calmly in the snow among the curly tree trunks. The brumbies did not flee as we quietly approached for a close encounter. The first inkling we had that all was not well was our observation that these animals were emaciated, with ribs and bony hips protruding, skin sagging. A few steps closer and we could see a fourth horse lying dead on the ground. Two of the horses had their snouts inside its gaping abdominal cavity, nibbling at what little remained of its digestive tract…” http://theconversation.com/the-grim-story-of-the-snowy-mountains-cannibal-horses-31691

Perth: The view from Caroline’s window Maksym Polyakov filmed a brown honeyeater feeding its young outside of Caroline Mitchell’s window at UWA. Just goes to show the economists can see past the numbers when it comes to public amenity benefit. Check out the post at https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=804549516263080

Melbourne: Alex Kusmanoff’s new survey on framing information Following from his previous survey, Alex is calling for around 100 people to participate in a related but even shorter survey (less than 5 mins). The survey can be completed by anybody over 18 years of age. Through these surveys, Alex is investigating how the way information is framed can affect attitudes toward public policy, including conservation measures. The survey link is: http://tinyurl.com/oldusnv

Brisbane: Kerrie Wilson wins the SCOPUS Young Researcher Award for the Life and Biological Sciences. The Scopus Young Researcher Awards are part of an Elsevier global initiative to recognise outstanding young scientists and researchers in Australasia who have made significant contributions in their areas of research. Applicants are assessed on the number of their publications over the last five years, the number of citations, the external impact of their research, and contributions to their field of research and/or to the broader research community. http://www.elsevier.com/about/press-releases/science-and-technology/elsevier-and-australasian-research-management-society-recognize-talented-young-scientists-at-scopus-award-ceremony

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About Dbytes Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David Salt (David.Salt@anu.edu.au). Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. Also, email David if you want to unsubscribe (or subscribe someone else). While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

 

About EDG The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG is jointly funded by the Australian Government’s National Environmental Research Program (NERP) and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence program (CEED). CEED: http://ceed.edu.au/ NERP ED: http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/ EDG: http://www.edg.org.au/

EDG major events: http://www.edg.org.au/events.html Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

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