Dbytes #179 (13 January 2015)

 

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decision Group “If you have border tensions with another country, making a big national park is a win-win. You create a buffer zone with a big national park and it can be a really good way of regulating the inflow of people and stopping a lot of the trafficking of goods.” Hugh Possingham (see item 2)

General News

1. Spatially Explicit Trends in the Global Conservation Status of Vertebrates

2. The complex relationship between national security and nature

3. Call for EPBC Act nominations

4. Performance audit on the administration of the Biodiversity Fund

5. 2015 Best Australian Science Writing anthology

EDG News

General EDG News: Trinity College Dublin joins CEED
Perth:
Melinda Moir successfully nominates another endangered plant louse
Brisbane: Hugh Possingham speaks on the seven deadly sins of conservation prioritisation
Melbourne: QAECO names their favourite science papers of 2014.
Canberra:
Don Driscoll and Sam Banks win media award for quirkiest story

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General News

1. Spatially Explicit Trends in the Global Conservation Status of Vertebrates [Recommended by Dean Ansell] …we quantify the contribution of regions and countries towards recent global trends in vertebrate conservation status (as measured by the Red List Index), to guide action towards the 2020 target….We found that >50% of the global deterioration in the conservation status of birds, mammals and amphibians is concentrated in <1% of the surface area, 39/1098 ecoregions (4%) and eight/195 countries (4%) – Australia, China, Colombia, Ecuador, Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, and the United States.…….Per capita wealth does not explain these patterns, with two of the richest countries – United States and Australia – fairing conspicuously poorly…. ……Indeed, two of the richest countries – United States and Australia – were amongst the worst performers http://www.plosone.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0113934#s4 -~<>~-

2. The complex relationship between national security and nature by Linda Vergnani ABC Environment PRESERVING INTACT ecosystems in the world’s marine and national parks is key to global security. This was the message of Pulitzer prize-winning New York Times correspondent Tom Friedman, who covers national security for the paper. http://www.abc.net.au/environment/articles/2015/01/08/4158774.htm -~<>~-

3. Call for EPBC Act nominations Any person may nominate a native species, ecological community or threatening process for listing under any of the categories specified in the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act). Nominations are now invited for the assessment period commencing 1 October 2015. Nominations for this assessment period may be submitted until 5 pm on Thursday 26 March 2015. http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatened/nominations -~<>~-

4. Performance audit on the administration of the Biodiversity Fund The Australian National Audit Office (ANAO) has completed its performance audit on Administration of the Biodiversity Fund program.

http://www.anao.gov.au/Publications/Audit-Reports/2014-2015/Administration-of-the-Biodiversity-Fund-Program -~<>~-

5. 2015 Best Australian Science Writing anthology From the editor Bianca Nogrady

The doors are once again open for submissions to NewSouth Publishing’s Best Australian Science Writing anthology and the Bragg UNSW Press Prize. As editor of the 2015 anthology, I’m looking for excellent science writing from all corners and dimensions of science; from the big picture to the intimately personal; from scientists and non-scientists; from poetry to prose, and everything in between. I’m interested in news stories, features, blogs, opinion pieces, poems, short stories, book chapters, and excerpts published since 1 January 2014. Soon-to-be published works will also be considered. Maximum length is 7000 words, but brevity is also appreciated. Entries published between 1 April 2014 and 31 March 2015 will also be eligible for Bragg UNSW Press Prize for Science Writing, which offers a first prize of $7000 and two runner-up prizes of $1500 each. To download a Bragg Prize entry form, visit http://www.newsouthpublishing.com/scienceprize. Please send your submissions (or queries) to bianca+BASW@biancanogrady.com by 31 March 2015, or visit http://www.newsouthpublishing.com/articles/best-australian-science-writing-2015-call-entries/ for more information.

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EDG News

General EDG News: Trinity College Dublin joins CEED Trinity College Dublin is now officially an international partner node in CEED with Yvonne Buckley & Shaun Coutts working on population responses to the environment & invasive species ecology & management. They had lots of CEED visitors in 2014 and look forward to more in 2015. http://www.tcd.ie/Zoology/research/research/buckley/

Perth: Melinda Moir successfully nominates another endangered plant louse Mick McCarthy’s plant-louse is set to join Peter Vesk’s plant-louse on the IUCN red list. Acizzia mccarthyi (McCarthy’s plant-louse), a threatened bug from the southwest biodiversity hotspot of Western Australia, has been accepted for listing on the 2015 IUCN red list as Endangered, after nomination by Melinda Moir. Also accepted for 2015 are the critically endangered Trioza barrettae (Sarah Barrett’s plant-louse) and Pseudococcus markharveyi (Mark Harvey’s mealybug) from the southwest. They join Acizzia veski on the list (see http://theconversation.com/australian-endangered-species-vesks-plant-louse-21288 ), all of which are threatened primarily by coextinction; loss of a dependent species with a change in the population size of a threatened host.

Brisbane: Hugh Possingham speaks on the seven deadly sins of conservation prioritisation Hugh gave this presentation at the ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies annual meeting towards the end of last year. See http://www.snipview.com/q/Hugh_Possingham

Melbourne: QAECO names their favourite science papers of 2014. We asked everyone at QAECO to name their favourite ecology, conservation and decision science papers of 2014. The list shows our diverse interests including models and monitoring, fire and frogs, botany and biodiversity and invasions and indices. Here’s what we chose and why.

Canberra: Don Driscoll and Sam Banks win media award for quirkiest story Don Driscoll and Sam Banks have been presented with an ANU Media Award 2014 in the category of “Quirkiest/Most Unusual Story”. Readers of Dbytes will probably know what that story was – Cannibal Horses of the Snowies, of course. http://www.anu.edu.au/news/all-news/anu-honours-its-top-media-performers [and see http://theconversation.com/the-grim-story-of-the-snowy-mountains-cannibal-horses-31691 for the story on the horses] -~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David Salt (David.Salt@anu.edu.au). Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it. To unsubscribe or change your details please visit: http://lists.science.uq.edu.au/mailman/listinfo/dbites

Please pass this link to any others who may want to subscribe too.

 

About EDG The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG is jointly funded by the Australian Government’s National Environmental Research Program (NERP) and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence program (CEED). CEED: http://ceed.edu.au/ NERP ED: http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/ EDG: http://www.edg.org.au/

EDG major events: http://www.edg.org.au/events.html Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

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