Dbytes #202 (30 June 2015)

Info & news for members and associates of the Environmental Decisions Group

“The Australian Government has a vision for our nation in which science is an integral part of our society and our economy.”
Minister for Industry and Science, Ian Macfarlane, foreword to ‘Vision for a science nation’. See item 3.

General News

1. Using Markets to Conserve Natural Capital

2. New fact sheet on Western Sydney Dry Rainforest and Moist Woodland on Shale: a nationally-protected ecological community

3. Have your say on the future of science in Australia

4. Reef Check Australia’s Citizen’s & Reef Science report

5. Galilee Basin – Unburnable Coal

EDG News

Melbourne: Cindy Hauser ranks alternatives in a Land of Sweeping Plains
Canberra:
Claire Foster writes on the role of emotion in leadership
Perth: Ram Pandit at IPBES expert-group meeting on ‘value and valuation methods’
Brisbane: CEED researchers and associates win Thomson Reuters Citation and Innovation Award

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General News

1. Using Markets to Conserve Natural Capital

Using Markets to Conserve Natural Capital describes opportunities to mobilise people and markets at the scale needed to create a healthy environment with a productive economy. It is the first paper in a series from the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists that elaborates on institutional and economic reforms in Blueprint for a Healthy Environment and Productive Economy. In this paper, the Wentworth Group of Concerned Scientists describes four key opportunities for reform: (1) apply a duty of care to prevent further environmental damage, (2) set a long-term emissions reduction target with a price on carbon, (3) eliminate fossil fuel subsidies and introduce an equitable, broad-based land tax to encourage transformation of the way we manage the Australian landscape, and (4) develop voluntary, industry-based farm certification so that farmers can receive benefits for managing their farms sustainably. We describe the benefits of these reforms and how each of these reforms can contribute to a healthy environment and a productive economy. http://wentworthgroup.org/2015/06/blueprint-paper-1-using-markets-to-conserve-natural-capital/2015/

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2. New fact sheet on Western Sydney Dry Rainforest and Moist Woodland on Shale: a nationally-protected ecological community

This guide is for anyone who wants to understand the national listing of the Western Sydney Dry Rainforest and Moist Woodland ecological community – what it is, why it is threatened and what national protection means for people in the region. http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/threatended/publications/western-sydney-dry-rainforest-moist-woodland-shale

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3. Have your say on the future of science in Australia The Minister for Industry and Science, the Hon Ian Macfarlane MP, and the Minister for Education and Training, the Hon Christopher Pyne MP, have released a consultation paper Vision for a Science Nation – Responding to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Australia’s Future. The purpose of this consultation is to test the Government’s response to the recommendations in the Chief Scientist’s report: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics: Australia’s Future. Consultation is open to 31 July 2015 via the Department of Industry and Science’s consultation hub. Vision for a science nation: http://science.gov.au/scienceGov/news/Documents/VisionForAScienceNationRespondingToSTEMAustraliasFuture.pdf Consultation: https://consult.industry.gov.au/science-and-commercialisation-policy-division/vision-for-a-science-nation

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4. Reef Check Australia’s Citizen’s & Reef Science report Reef Check Australia have released Citizen’s & Reef Science, the summary report celebrating and sharing key data findings, projects from Reef Check Australia 2001-2014. This report forms the starting point of an ongoing initiative to translate RCA citizen science data into positive outcomes for reef, oceans and humans. They intend to expand on the four case studies presented in this report with an ongoing series of case studies, exploring new data analyses and applications. http://www.reefcheckaustralia.org/files/documents/544/rca_rca_citizens_and_reef_science_report_web.pdf?utm_source=RCA+members&utm_campaign=3d393c013e-RCA_eNews_April_20154_30_2015&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_737ba33da3-3d393c013e-44007749

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5. Galilee Basin – Unburnable Coal By Will Steffen This new report reveals that if all of the Galilee Basin coal was burned, an estimated 705 million tonnes of CO2 would be released each year – more than 1.3 times Australia’s current annual emissions. -Any new coal mine is fundamentally at odds with protecting Australia from the impacts of climate change. -More than 90% of known, extractable coal in Australia’s existing coal reserves must stay in the ground. Therefore, there is no justification for opening new coal mines – the most pressing challenge Australia faces is how to phase out existing coal mines well before their reserves are exhausted. http://www.climatecouncil.org.au/galilee-basin-unburnable-coal

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EDG News

Melbourne: Cindy Hauser ranks alternatives in a Land of Sweeping Plains “I’ve made a small contribution to the recently published book, Land of Sweeping Plains. The focus of this edited volume is the restoration and management of the native temperate grasslands of south-eastern Australia. It seeks to be much more than a prescriptive textbook, containing a high density of colour photographs, some poetry and artwork, and a discussion of social context and connection. The break-out box I’ve written regards how we can select suitable weed management activities. I’ve drawn from the literature of structured decision making and cost benefit analysis to list the set of factors worth considering and how to combine them to rank alternatives.” Ref: Hauser, C.E. (2015) Prioritising weed management alternatives, in Land of Sweeping Plains. Williams, N.S.G., Marshall, A. and Morgan, J.W., eds. CSIRO Publishing, Clayton South VIC Australia.

Canberra: Claire Foster writes on the role of emotion in leadership This article is part of the CEED Early Career Leaders Blog “As others have expressed in previous posts, a fundamental aspect of leadership is self-leadership – directing your own thinking, feeling and behaviour to achieve objectives. In learning about self-leadership, one thing that struck a chord with me is the idea of emotional intelligence, and the role of emotion in leadership. As a result, the theme of emotional intelligence has been a core part of my activities and exploration during the year. In this post I will be sharing some of what I have learnt about the role of emotion in leadership. It’s a summary of ideas that have come from reading widely, self-reflection, discussion with other CEED leaders, and also my experience representing the ACT in the Australian Ultimate Championships.” http://ceedleaders.weebly.com/

Perth: Ram Pandit at IPBES expert-group meeting on ‘value and valuation methods’ Ram Pandit of the School of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the UWA recently participated (8-11 June 2015) in an Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) expert-group meeting on ‘value and valuation methods’ in Budapest, Hungary. Multidisciplinary experts including Indigenous Local Knowledge holders are working together to develop a guide on ‘conceptualization of values and their assessment based on different valuation methods’, which will be used in IPBES-based assessments in the future.

Brisbane: CEED researchers and associates win Thomson Reuters Citation and Innovation Award Congratulations to CEED researchers who have won a prestigious Thomson Reuters Citation Award for their significant contribution to climate change research. Hugh Possingham and Eve McDonald-Madden from The University of Queensland, and Tara Martinn from CSIRO, have been recognised for their research into the effects of climate change on habitat loss and conservation decisions. The research was conducted in collaboration with Jane Elith (The University of Melbourne), Chrystal Mantyka-Pringle (University of Saskatchewan, formerly University of Queensland) and CEED International Scientific Advisory Panel member Antoine Guisan (Université de Lausanne). The prize was awarded jointly. http://ceed.edu.au/ceed-news/2013-06-03-22-58-24/244-conservation-research-efforts-recognised.html

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About Dbytes Dbytes is the eNewsletter of the Environmental Decisions Group. If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David Salt (David.Salt@anu.edu.au). Please keep them short and provide a link for more info. While Dbytes is primarily aimed at members of the EDG, anyone is welcome to receive it.

About EDG The Environmental Decision Group (EDG) is a network of conservation researchers working on the science of effective decision making to better conserve biodiversity. Our members are largely based at the University of Queensland, the Australian National University, the University of Melbourne, the University of Western Australia, RMIT and CSIRO. The EDG is jointly funded by the Australian Government’s National Environmental Research Program (NERP) and the Australian Research Council’s Centre of Excellence program (CEED). CEED: http://ceed.edu.au/ NERP ED: http://www.nerpdecisions.edu.au/ EDG: http://www.edg.org.au/

Decision Point: http://www.decision-point.com.au/

 

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