Dbytes #387 (31 July 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“There are several reasons why it can be worth measuring the impacts of environmental research, including making a case for the funding of environmental research, informing decisions about research priorities, and helping researchers to make decisions about their research that increase its ultimate benefits.”
David Pannell on measuring the impact of environmental research, the example of CEED [see item 1]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Measuring impacts from environmental research (the example of CEED)
2. The ABS issued ‘Australian Environmental-Economic Accounts, 2019’.
3. Australia’s faunal extinction crisis
4. Evaluating Community Attitudes Toward the Management of Australian Wildlife
5. Long-term Reef Monitoring Program – Annual Summary Report on coral reef condition for 2018/19

6. CSIRO said around 45% of our coastal marine ecosystems have suffered from the impact of climate extremes.
7. Have you got climate zombies? We debunk the myths that refuse to die

1. Measuring impacts from environmental research (the example of CEED)

There have been some studies considering the relationship between research and environmental policy but studies capturing the impact of research on environmental management, environmental policy, and environmental outcomes are relatively rare. Here is one attempt.
Earlier this year we released the results of an assessment of the engagement and impacts of a particular environmental research centre, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). The assessment includes impacts on policy, management and the community, as well as measures of academic performance, including publications, citations and collaborations. Data were collected in several ways: a survey of all project leaders for the Centre’s 87 projects, the preparation of detailed case studies for selected projects, and collection of statistics on publications, citations and collaborations.

http://www.pannelldiscussions.net/

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2. The ABS issued ‘Australian Environmental-Economic Accounts, 2019’.

https://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs@.nsf/mf/4655.0?OpenDocument

and see ‘An environmental accounting primer’, What is it? (and why should we use it?)
https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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3. Australia’s faunal extinction crisis

On 23 July 2019, the Senate agreed to the committee’s recommendation that this inquiry be re-adopted in the 46th Parliament for inquiry and report by 13 November 2019. All correspondence and evidence previously received for this inquiry has been made available to the new committee. This means that submissions already provided to the committee about this issue do not need to be re-submitted. The committee intends to refer to the evidence received during the 45th Parliament. However, the committee has also agreed to receive new submissions and additional material updating existing submissions until 13 August 2019.

https://www.aph.gov.au/Parliamentary_Business/Committees/Senate/Environment_and_Communications/Faunalextinction2019
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4. Evaluating Community Attitudes Toward the Management of Australian Wildlife

The management of wildlife in Australia is often contentious, however there is limited information available in relation to community attitudes. This project seeks to gain insight into the attitudes of Australians toward wildlife management.

https://cqushhss.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_eYidykFtBSHCjsN

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5. Long-term Reef Monitoring Program – Annual Summary Report on coral reef condition for 2018/19


AIMS’ long-term monitoring provides information on the status and trends of the GBR to reef managers.

https://www.aims.gov.au/reef-monitoring/gbr-condition-summary-2018-2019

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6. CSIRO said around 45% of our coastal marine ecosystems have suffered from the impact of climate extremes.

Researchers at CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, have for the first-time collated published works by leading researchers of climate impacts around the whole of Australia’s coast to reveal that around 45 per cent of our coastal marine ecosystems have suffered from the impact of climate extremes.

https://outlook.office.com/mail/inbox/id/AAQkADA1MzhiY2RkLTE2ODQtNDFjYi04Njc2LTA2NTc3OGU2NjJmNwAQAPxqPka3MLFMqxANIcnlPWk%3D

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7. Have you got climate zombies? We debunk the myths that refuse to die

https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2019-07-27/climate-change-denial-zombies-killed/11291724

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt

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