Dbytes #388 (7 August 2019)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“The government has effectively made its deforestation laws retrospective and in the process has endorsed possibly hundreds of incidents of environmental lawbreaking. This decision undermines the rule of law and sets a dangerous precedent.”
Kate Smolski, CEO, Nature Conservation Council [See item 4]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Collaborative Australian Protected Area Database (CAPAD) User Survey
2. From polite persuasion to radical activism — the birth of the modern environment movement
3. Macquarie’s agriculture company extends its land clearing with precision farming
4. NSW farmers granted amnesty for illegal land-clearing
5. From Townsville to Tuvalu: health and climate change in Australia and the Asia Pacific region
6. July Was the Hottest Month in Human History
7. Australia’s climate stance is inflicting criminal damage on humanity
8. Displacement is the game when you have nothing really to say (on the environment)

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1. Collaborative Australian Protected Area Database (CAPAD) User Survey

The Department of the Environment and Energy is currently consulting users of the Collaborative Australian Protected Area Database (CAPAD) to better understand how it is used and to shape its future production.

CAPAD is a national scale collation of protected area spatial information every 2 years from commonwealth, state and territory agencies and other protected area managers and represents both the marine and terrestrial environments. Summary figures of the areas that contribute to the ‘National Reserve System’ are reported internationally by the Australian Government.

Closes 31 Dec 2019

https://environment.au.citizenspace.com/knowledge-and-technology/capad/

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2. From polite persuasion to radical activism — the birth of the modern environment movement

Environmental protests in Australia haven’t always involved bulldozers, being chained to gates or mass arrests. In fact, the activism we often see today represents a radical break from the movement’s far more genteel origins. Environmentalists — although they weren’t always called that — have been active in Australia since the 1860s.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-04/history-and-genesis-of-modern-environment-movement/11366782

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3. Macquarie’s agriculture company extends its land clearing with precision farming

As land clearing continues across NSW, locals around Holbrook in the state’s south are worried river red gums on the Murrumbidgee River will become the next hot spot.

The Fifth Estate

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4. NSW farmers granted amnesty for illegal land-clearing

Environment movement accuses the Berejiklian government of caving in to big agribusiness over the amnesty

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2019/aug/01/nsw-farmers-granted-amnesty-for-illegal-land-clearing?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

And see Native Vegetation Act amnesty angers partner of slain environment officer Glen Turner

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5. From Townsville to Tuvalu: health and climate change in Australia and the Asia Pacific region

The link between environmental and human health has not been at the centre of Australian policymaking. This paper hopes to redress that gap, and to inspire effective policy solutions to an issue of vast and growing significance to Australia, its region, and the world.

https://apo.org.au/node/250786

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6. July Was the Hottest Month in Human History
The climate disaster isn’t coming. It’s here.

July 2019 is now the hottest month in recorded history, the U.N. confirmed on Thursday. At a press conference in New York, U.N. Secretary General António Guterres announced that the month of July had reached 1.2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels.

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/politics-news/july-2019-hottest-month-ever-866436/

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7. Australia’s climate stance is inflicting criminal damage on humanity

The government opts for conflict rather than change, while suppressing details on the implications of its climate inaction.

The blatant inconsistency of Australia’s position beggars belief. We are signatories to the UNFCCC, supposedly committed to avoiding dangerous climate change, which is already happening. Australia ratified the Paris agreement to restrict temperature increase below 2C and ideally towards 1.5C, yet our emissions are rising rapidly even though there is no carbon budget remaining to stay below even 2C. Incredibly, we ramp up new fossil fuel projects: Adani coal, gas expansion, fracking in NT and WA, and more. Then we have the gall to carry over unused carbon credits from the Kyoto protocol to obscure the failure of our wholly inadequate Paris emission reduction commitments; credits which were unjustified in the first place.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2019/aug/03/australias-climate-stance-is-inflicting-criminal-damage-on-humanity?CMP=share_btn_tw

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8. Displacement is the game when you have nothing really to say (on the environment)

Based on what our Environment Minister is saying in Parliament in answer to questions from her own side, the game appears to be to focus on the little picture and displace everyone’s attention.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. For the past decade Dbytes has been supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to received it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David Salt


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