Dbytes #418 (26 March 2020)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


“While praying to the Gods of Efficiency and Specialisation, humanity has essentially forgotten to remain healthy and resilient.”
Joern Fischer


In this issue of Dbytes

1. 300 days of weather in 2 minutes
2. Global opportunities and challenges for transboundary conservation
3. The size of Australia’s bushfire crisis captured in five big numbers
4. Making video lectures
5. A good decision in a time of plague
6. Coronavirus: The Hammer and the Dance
7. The maths and ethics of minimizing COVID-19 deaths

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1. 300 days of weather in 2 minutes

World Meteorological Day is held on March 23 each year. The Bureau of Meteorology has released a video condensing nine months’ worth of Australian weather into just two minutes. The video has been released to mark World Meteorological Day, stitching together nearly 300 days’ worth of satellite imagery, captured by the Himawari satellite more than 35,000 kilometres above the equator. The drought and fire that was a feature for much of the country’s south and east in 2019 is clearly visible, with dramatic images of smoke drifting across the Tasman Sea emanating from the fires which devastated parts of the country.

http://media.bom.gov.au/releases/773/on-world-meteorological-day-australias-weather-from-space/

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2. Global opportunities and challenges for transboundary conservation

“We use metrics of governance, collaboration, and human pressure to provide an index of transboundary conservation feasibility to assess global opportunities and challenges for different nations.”

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41559-020-1160-3

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3. The size of Australia’s bushfire crisis captured in five big numbers

To convey a sense of the unprecedented scale of the disaster much of the reporting focused on numbers, but where did these figures come from? Here, we take a close-up look at five of these numbers: where they come from, and whether they’re for real.

ABC News

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4. Making video lectures

Universities around the world have moved to online teaching in response to Covid-19. Many university teachers who have done little or no online teaching are having to upskill rapidly. Here, I share my three top tips for making effective video lectures.

www.pannelldiscussions.net/2020/03/334-making-video-lectures/

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5. A good decision in a time of plague

Trust is not a given, it’s earned. It’s difficult to build and is easily lost. However, if the process is genuinely well informed by the science – and is transparent, fair and adaptive – the trust bank is built on solid foundations and will continue standing regardless of tough operating conditions, setbacks, slip ups and sub-optimal decisions – all of which are a given in a time of plague and mass disruption.
https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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6. Coronavirus: The Hammer and the Dance

Summary of the article: Strong coronavirus measures today should only last a few weeks, there shouldn’t be a big peak of infections afterwards, and it can all be done for a reasonable cost to society, saving millions of lives along the way. If we don’t take these measures, tens of millions will be infected, many will die, along with anybody else that requires intensive care, because the healthcare system will have collapsed.

Editor’s note: highly recommended story on coronavirus, jam packed with insights

https://medium.com/@tomaspueyo/coronavirus-the-hammer-and-the-dance-be9337092b56

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7. The maths and ethics of minimizing COVID-19 deaths

The Australian Government must clarify its COVID-19 strategy, but to do so means understanding the maths and ethics of either ‘flattening the curve’ or an eradication endgame

https://pursuit.unimelb.edu.au/articles/the-maths-and-ethics-of-minimising-covid-19-deaths

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


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