Dbytes #423 (29 April 2020)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


“Governance is struggling to address the new normal as ecosystem assemblages transform to novel configurations. A central challenge for policy makers in the Anthropocene is navigating environmental crises and coping with societal insecurity and change. Ecosystem governance needs a new paradigm to embrace rapid change and shape future trajectories.”
Morrison et al, 2020 [see item 2]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Conservation plans help boost threatened mammals
2. Advancing Coral Reef Governance into the Anthropocene
3. Setting the stage for invasive species research
4. The top 10 threats facing humanity and how we overcome them
5. Fatal Calculations: How Economics has Underestimated Climate Damage and Encouraged Inaction
6. Washing off the virus: Will we throw the environmental baby out with the bathwater?
7. Coronavirus doubters follow climate denial playbook

-~<>~-

1. Conservation plans help boost threatened mammals

While some species have declined by more than a third overall, where conservation measures are in place they have increased by 46%.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/apr/23/conservation-plans-help-boost-threatened-mammals-scientists-find

-~<>~-

2. Advancing Coral Reef Governance into the Anthropocene

The unprecedented global heatwave of 2014–2017 was a defining event for many ecosystems. Widespread degradation caused by coral bleaching, for example, highlighted the vulnerability of hundreds of millions of people dependent on reefs for their livelihoods, well-being, and food security. Scientists and policy makers are now reassessing long-held assumptions about coping with anthropogenic climate change, particularly the assumption that strong local institutions can maintain ecological and social resilience through ecosystem-based management, adaptation, and restoration. Governance is struggling to address the new normal as ecosystem assemblages transform to novel configurations. A central challenge for policy makers in the Anthropocene is navigating environmental crises and coping with societal insecurity and change. Ecosystem governance needs a new paradigm to embrace rapid change and shape future trajectories. In this Perspective, we focus on coral reefs as vanguards for governance transformation. We explain the spatial, temporal, and political dynamics of reefs as they respond to climate change and outline a new governance paradigm applicable to all ecosystems

https://www.cell.com/one-earth/fulltext/S2590-3322(19)30273-8?_returnURL=https%3A%2F%2Flinkinghub.elsevier.com%2Fretrieve%2Fpii%2FS2590332219302738%3Fshowall%3Dtrue

-~<>~-

3. Setting the stage for invasive species research

The old adage prevention is the best medicine applies to many things, including invasive species – plants, animals or even diseases that are not native to Australia, but once they arrive can quickly become a problem. Stopping new, environmentally harmful invasive species from arriving and establishing in Australia is one of the most cost-effective actions we can take to protect our native species from invading weeds, feral animals and diseases.

https://invasives.org.au/blog/setting-the-stage-for-invasive-species-research/

-~<>~-

4. The top 10 threats facing humanity and how we overcome them

As Australia’s harsh bushfire season was backed up with a global pandemic, human extinction went from being the stuff of nightmares to something that could conceivably happen on our watch. Now the newly formed Commission for the Human Future, which is made up of Australian scientists, academics and leaders, have tabled the top 10 threats we face as a global community, and how we can easily act to fix them.

https://thenewdaily.com.au/news/2020/04/22/threats-human-extinction/

-~<>~-

5. Fatal Calculations: How Economics has Underestimated Climate Damage and Encouraged Inaction

A rational response from Australia’s leaders to the unprecedented and disastrous 2019-20 megafires would have recognised, first, that they are another warning— and the strongest yet — that the catastrophic impacts of human-induced climate change are here now as lives are lost and livelihoods destroyed. Second, it would accept the need for emergency action. But no. The moment the rains came and extinguished the fires, rationality sank back into the political swamp. The government’s commitment to massive fossil fuel expansion immediately resurfaced. Apparently nothing could be contemplated which might interfere with maximising short-term economic growth, or achieving a budget surplus — until the coronavirus hit hard. And disinformation exploded, as denialists attempted to fob off bushfires as just another example of Dorothea Mckellar’s “Land of drought and flooding rains”. Nothing unusual here, they said, move on.

https://johnmenadue.com/ian-dunlop-fatal-calculations-how-economics-has-underestimated-climate-damage-and-encouraged-inaction/?mc_cid=013bc01176&mc_eid=01b82a443d

-~<>~-

6. Washing off the virus: Will we throw the environmental baby out with the bathwater?

might this crisis be used to justify a political narrative about environmental regulation being ‘green tape’? Could we, in the name of curing the current big crisis, end up accelerating the next big crisis, brought on by environmental decline?

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

-~<>~-

7. Coronavirus doubters follow climate denial playbook

Whether denying coronavirus or climate change, many deploy the same unfounded strategies and messages.

https://www.yaleclimateconnections.org/2020/04/coronavirus-doubters-follow-climate-denial-playbook/

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s