Dbytes #424 (29 May 2020)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


Australia’s environmental laws are “strong on paper but they’re under-resourced and under-implemented so the outcome is they are not as strong on the ground”
Peter Burnett [see item 1]

In this issue of Dbytes

1. ‘Cashed-up activists’ should not be able to hold up developments, Australia’s resources minister says
2. ‘We don’t know what we’ve lost’: the small-scale tragedy of the Australian bushfires
3. ‘A Bomb in the Center of the Climate Movement’: Michael Moore Damages Our Most Important Goal
4. No, Aussie bats won’t give you COVID-19. We rely on them more than you think
5. APPEA releases updated global sustainability reporting guide
6. A history of FLICC: the 5 techniques of science denial
7. Joining the dots on Sustainability Bites

-~<>~-

1. ‘Cashed-up activists’ should not be able to hold up developments, Australia’s resources minister says

Keith Pitt says review of environmental laws must look at how to ‘streamline’ assessment processes for major projects

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/apr/30/cashed-up-activists-should-not-be-able-to-hold-up-developments-keith-pitt-says

And see Coalition is aiming to change Australia’s environment laws before review is finished

-~<>~-

2. ‘We don’t know what we’ve lost’: the small-scale tragedy of the Australian bushfires

The survival of a tiny species of ancient trapdoor spider hinges on what happens next

https://www.thenational.ae/world/oceania/we-don-t-know-what-we-ve-lost-the-small-scale-tragedy-of-the-australian-bushfires-1.1011955

-~<>~-

3. ‘A Bomb in the Center of the Climate Movement’: Michael Moore Damages Our Most Important Goal

It hurts to be personally attacked in a movie. It hurts more to see a movement divided

https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/political-commentary/bill-mckibben-climate-movement-michael-moore-993073/

-~<>~-

4. No, Aussie bats won’t give you COVID-19. We rely on them more than you think

In this pandemic it’s tempting to look for someone, or something, to blame. Bats are a common scapegoat and the community is misled to believe getting rid of them could be a quick fix. But are bats really the problem?

Australian bats have been in the news recently for two main reasons: the misplaced fear they might carry COVID-19, and overblown reports they carry a koala-killing virus.

This recent bad press has seen increased incidences of disturbing cruelty against Australia’s bats, as well as calls to cull or “move on” bats that live close to people. Because fewer bats would mean less disease, right? Wrong. Here’s why.

https://theconversation.com/no-aussie-bats-wont-give-you-covid-19-we-rely-on-them-more-than-you-think-137168

-~<>~-

5. APPEA releases updated global sustainability reporting guide

The fourth edition of the Sustainability Reporting Guide provides oil and gas companies with a clear framework to demonstrate their important role by reporting on how they manage climate and sustainability impacts and opportunities. Updates to the guidance have been applied to six focus areas:
Reporting process
Governance and business ethics
Climate change and energy
Environment
Safety, health and security
Social impacts.

https://www.appea.com.au/2020/05/industry-releases-updated-global-sustainability-reporting-guide/

-~<>~-

6. A history of FLICC: the 5 techniques of science denial

In 2007, Mark Hoofnagle suggested on his Science Blog Denialism that denialists across a range of topics such as climate change, evolution, & HIV/AIDS all employed the same rhetorical tactics to sow confusion. The five general tactics were conspiracy, selectivity (cherry-picking), fake experts, impossible expectations (also known as moving goalposts), and general fallacies of logic.
Two years later, Pascal Diethelm and Martin McKee published an article in the scientific journal European Journal of Public Health titled Denialism: what is it and how should scientists respond? They further fleshed out Hoofnagle’s five denialist tactics and argued that we should expose to public scrutiny the tactics of denial, identifying them for what they are. I took this advice to heart and began including the five denialist tactics in my own talks about climate misinformation…

https://www.skepticalscience.com/history-FLICC-5-techniques-science-denial.html

-~<>~-

7. Joining the dots on Sustainability Bites

In a world staggering from one crisis to the next, stricken with plague and quarreling over solutions, where lies the true path to sustainability? Have we got a story for you, and we present it in 66 compelling chapters.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s