Dbytes #445 (30 September 2020)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“You can’t offset geological carbon — ie fossil fuels — with biological carbon. It’s only a buffer that gives you a bit of time to get your geological carbon under control.”
Will Steffen

In this issue of Dbytes

1. Building a Shared Future for All Life on Earth: China in Action
2. Conservation Status Assessment Project, Victoria
3. Environmental Standards: are they really the treasure at the end of the rainbow?
4. Comparing threatened species recovery plans from USA, NSW and NZ
5. ‘Citizen sensing: Sensing the risk
6. Expansion of Vertebrate Pest Exclusion Fencing and Its Potential Benefits for Threatened Fauna Recovery in Australia
7. Scientists map the potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon

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1. Building a Shared Future for All Life on Earth: China in Action

Position Paper of the People’s Republic of China for the United Nations Summit on Biodiversity

“As the incoming presidency of the 15th Conference of the Parties (COP15) to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), China is a staunch advocate of multilateralism and has always been an active participant and facilitator of the multilateral process of biodiversity. China stands for the balanced implementation of the Convention’s three objectives, namely the conservation of biological diversity, the sustainable use of its components and the fair and equitable sharing of the benefits arising out of the utilization of genetic resources. China urges all parties, under the principles of fairness, transparency and parties-driven process, to broaden consensus, move in the same direction, and facilitate the adoption of an ambitious, balanced and realistic Post-2020 Global Biodiversity Framework, and move toward a more just and equitable biodiversity governance system that embodies the best efforts of all parties.”

http://au.china-embassy.org/eng/sghdxwfb_1/t1817741.htm

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2. Conservation Status Assessment Project, Victoria

DELWP has re-assessed the conservation status of all animals, plants and fungi that are currently considered to be rare or threatened in Victoria, and these are now available for public comment. Submissions close on November 20, 2020.

https://www.environment.vic.gov.au/conserving-threatened-species/conservation-status-assessment-project

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3. Environmental Standards: are they really the treasure at the end of the rainbow?

‘Environmental Standards’ look set to become part of environmental regulation in Australia and many people are wondering whether they will be good enough and, even if they are, how will it change things.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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4. Comparing threatened species recovery plans from USA, NSW and NZ

Researchers examine threatened species recovery plans from USA, NSW and NZ, to look at how much is spent on research and monitoring versus direct recovery actions. It turns out that over 50% of budgets in recovery plans are allocated to research and monitoring. This seems like an awful lot, and I [Joe Bennet] suspect it may be higher in other places where plans are not as carefully constructed. In fact, some species in USA had almost their entire budgets allocated to monitoring. Species with higher proportions of budgets spent on monitoring tended to fare worse over time. We recommend carefully prioritizing monitoring actions alongside other actions, to make sure the information that is critical to decisions is obtained.

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-020-18486-6

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5. Citizen sensing: Sensing the risk

An accessible ‘toolbox’ for interested citizen science communities and policy-makers wishing to integrate citizen-sensed data into risk governance and environmental decisions.

https://digi-courses.com/openpresstiu-sensing-the-risk/

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6. Expansion of Vertebrate Pest Exclusion Fencing and Its Potential Benefits for Threatened Fauna Recovery in Australia

Globally, there is a need to preserve threatened species before they disappear. The management of these species is often aided, particularly in Australia, by the addition of exclusion fences that prevent the movement of invasive or pest predators and competitors into the conservation area. Widespread use of conservation fences is limited by the availability of suitable conservation land and the relatively high costs of such fencing. Here, we discuss the potential conservation benefit of pest exclusion fences erected on agricultural land. We assess the spatial overlap of existing agricultural exclusion fences (known as “cluster fences”) with the potential habitat of listed threatened species and consider whether or not identified threats to these species are potentially alleviated within cluster fences. We find that there are several species that face threats which may be alleviated with cluster fences and propose that active recovery of threatened species on fenced agricultural land be seriously considered.

https://www.mdpi.com/2076-2615/10/9/1550?utm_source=CISS+external+e-news+subscriber+list&utm_campaign=fbfd823df5-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2020_01_09_01_25_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_dca65e59c7-fbfd823df5-85300405

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7. Scientists map the potential for natural forest regrowth to capture carbon

Dr Roxburgh said the study found climate, rather than past land use, was the most important driver of potential carbon accumulation, with the work providing an important benchmark to assess the global potential of forest regrowth as a climate mitigation strategy.

https://www.csiro.au/en/News/News-releases/2020/Scientists-map-the-potential-for-natural-forest-regrowth-to-capture-carbon

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


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