Dbytes #446 (7 October 2020)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


“I argue that international summits on protecting the living world may be worse than useless, as the pledges leaders make are designed to spread false assurance.”
George Monbiot


In this issue of Dbytes

1. National Feral Cat Management Survey
2. Trust lies bleeding
3. World Habitat Day – Oil and gas infrastructures become fish havens
4. Rain in the Condamine – agriculture versus environment; the wealthy versus the dispossessed. Water is dividing us in the Murray-Darling Basin.
5. 84% of global freshwater species populations lost since 1970: can we ‘bend the curve’ of this trend?
6. Australia joins US, China and Russia in refusing to sign leaders’ pledge on biodiversity
7. Connecting Research With Policy: Guide to Writing for Policy-Makers

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1. National Feral Cat Management Survey

Researchers from RMIT University are looking for volunteers to participate in a survey that asks questions about feral cat management in Australia. The information collected will help to generate a better understanding of feral cat management across the nation, including how to make improvements. The online survey should take around 5 to 10 minutes to complete and will consist primarily of short, multiple-choice questions about feral cats and efforts taken to manage them. Participation is voluntary and, if you choose to participate, you will remain completely anonymous. The survey will be open until November 1st.

If you would like to participate in this survey and help with this research, please visit the following link – https://bit.ly/Cats2020ind

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2. Trust lies bleeding

Their capacity to spread untruth is only made possible when a significant portion of the community don’t trust the mainstream media or the science it reports on. Anti-vaxxers and Q-Anonists don’t get to spread their vicious conspiracies if the broader public is resistant to their poison; informed and responsive to real emerging threats. And climate deniers (and the many vested interests that use them to sustain their wealth) won’t be able to distort and pervert important policy reform to move humanity to a more sustainable footing.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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3. World Habitat Day – Oil and gas infrastructures become fish havens

The 5 October was World Habitat Day and while the United Nations’ emphasis is on shelter for humans, man-made structures can make the most unlikely homes for other species. A project funded by the Fisheries Research and Development Corporation explores the pros and cons of leaving old oil and gas infrastructures in the waters off Karratha in northern Western Australia as they are now home to a myriad of marine species. 

https://www.frdc.com.au/media-publications/news-and-media-releases/Oil-and-gas-infrastructures-become-fish-havens

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4. Rain in the Condamine – agriculture versus environment; the wealthy versus the dispossessed. Water is dividing us in the Murray-Darling Basin.

In the Condamine Catchment, and others in the northern Murray-Darling Basin, the rains came but for many downstream on the Baaka/Darling, the river still failed to flow. Bitter tears were shed as people desperate for water discovered the rules had dealt them out of the equation. Matt Colloff takes a hard look at what is happening along the Condamine Catchment and concludes it’s time to stop the water wars and find ways of re-framing the values that legitimise the rights and benefits of the few at the expense of the many.
https://globalwaterforum.org/

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5. 84% of global freshwater species populations lost since 1970: can we ‘bend the curve’ of this trend?

Global populations of mammals, birds, amphibians, reptiles and fish have, on average, declined by two-thirds since 1970, according to the latest WWF Living Planet Report, released earlier this month. Continuing the trends shown in past reports, freshwaters are particularly imperilled: with 84% of global freshwater species populations lost between 1970 and 2016. The bi-annual Living Planet Report tracks trends in global wildlife abundance, based on data from 21,000 populations of more than 4,000 vertebrate species. Population declines in freshwater ecosystems – which equate to an average annual loss of 4% globally – were higher than those in terrestrial and oceanic environments.

https://freshwaterblog.net/2020/09/25/84-of-global-freshwater-species-populations-lost-since-1970-can-we-bend-the-curve-of-this-trend/

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6. Australia joins US, China and Russia in refusing to sign leaders’ pledge on biodiversity
Scott Morrison declined as 10-point plan calls for commitments considered inconsistent with government policy

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/sep/29/australia-joins-us-china-and-russia-in-refusing-to-sign-leaders-pledge-on-biodiversity

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7. Connecting Research With Policy: Guide to Writing for Policy-Makers

“In the course of their research, most environmental researchers are likely to identify issues that have implications for government policy-makers and decision-makers. This guide has been designed by the NESP TSR Hub to support researchers working in the environmental field to develop communications tailored for these end-users. It outlines four types of products designed to communicate research with policy end-users”

https://www.nespthreatenedspecies.edu.au/media/eb1d1aq2/science-for-policy-guidelines-report_v13.pdf

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


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