Dbytes #448 (23 October 2020)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


“Brazilian rosewood remains threatened, and illegal logging of rosewood species elsewhere is a major problem. Of all the species protected under CITES, rosewood (covering all rosewood species) is the most trafficked commodity, far exceeding traffic in things like elephant ivory.”
Richard Hobbs on the The Cadillac of Woods: Brazilian Rosewood
[Editor’s note: For those that don’t know, Richard is a restoration guru and a guitar nut. In his new blog he combines his two passions.]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Rewild to mitigate the climate crisis, urge leading scientists
2. Wellbeing, values, and planning in environmental management
3. What is carbon offsetting and is it worthwhile?
4. Artificial nesting hollows are providing a ‘cockatoo Club Med’ on farms in Western Australia
5. ‘We have to change Queensland’: the environmental issues at stake in the election
6. Changing the narrative of climate change
7. Dishing the dirt: Australia’s move to store carbon in soil is a problem for tackling climate change

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1. Rewild to mitigate the climate crisis, urge leading scientists

Restoring degraded natural lands highly effective for carbon storage and avoiding species extinctions

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2020/oct/14/re-wild-to-mitigate-the-climate-crisis-urge-leading-scientists

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2. Wellbeing, values, and planning in environmental management

Concepts of human wellbeing and values are central to environmental planning.
A mid-level theory is developed to link wellbeing, values, elements, and processes.
This approach supports group deliberations in environmental management.
Arguments concerning plural values versus monism are addressed.
Debates concerning intrinsic value of nature are resolved at the level of principles.

From the lead author, Ken Wallace: “’Values’ and ‘wellbeing’ have long been considered important in planning the conservation and use of natural resources. Yet, in 2019 an article on ecosystem service frameworks bemoaned the lack of connection between these and wellbeing. At the same time our Treasurer scoffed at the idea of a wellbeing budget, and we have been subjected to poorly constructed binary trade-offs such as ‘health’ vs ‘economics’. It seems like a good time to thoroughly think through concepts of values and wellbeing, and their connection to the use and conservation of natural resources.”

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479720313724?dgcid=author

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3. What is carbon offsetting and is it worthwhile?

One topic that is raised time and again by our community is whether, and how, to offset greenhouse gas emissions.

https://www.climatecouncil.org.au/resources/carbon-offsetting-worthwhile/

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4. Artificial nesting hollows are providing a ‘cockatoo Club Med’ on farms in Western Australia

Artificial hollows are helping Carnaby’s Black cockatoos breed. Researchers say sites need to be well chosen. Community help is wanted to identify nesting sites.

ABC News

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5. ‘We have to change Queensland’: the environmental issues at stake in the election

Can Queensland break away from fossil fuel extraction and develop jobs and growth in a way that protects the state’s landscapes and ocean wonders?

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2020/oct/18/we-have-to-change-queensland-the-environmental-issues-at-stake-in-the-election?CMP=share_btn_tw

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6. Changing the narrative of climate change

Social identity, not scientific evidence, drives many people’s attitudes on climate change.

https://www.lowyinstitute.org/the-interpreter/changing-narrative-climate-change

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7. Dishing the dirt: Australia’s move to store carbon in soil is a problem for tackling climate change

But the government’s plan contains misconceptions about both biochar, and the general effectiveness of soil carbon as an emissions reduction strategy.

https://apo.org.au/node/308687?mc_cid=c3c1c710aa&mc_eid=05cef4328a

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


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