Dbytes #465 (3 March 2021)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“Making peace with nature is the defining task of the 21st century. It must be the top priority for everyone, everywhere.”
António Guterres, secretary general of the UN, in The Guardian
[and see item 1]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Making peace with nature
2. Australian scientists warn urgent action needed to save 19 ‘collapsing’ ecosystems
3. Climate Change is Weakening the Ocean Currents That Shape Weather on Both Sides of the Atlantic
4. How Australia began dealing with this thing called ‘the Environment’?
5. Let’s talk about standards for scholarly opinion articles
6. What Scientists Have Learned from 100 Years of Bird Banding
7. The world’s forgotten fishes: Freshwater fish in ‘catastrophic’ decline

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1. Making peace with nature

A scientific blueprint to tackle the climate, biodiversity and pollution emergencies

This report outlines how climate change, biodiversity loss and pollution can be tackled jointly within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals. The report serves to translate the current state of scientific knowledge into crisp, clear and digestible facts-based messages that the world can relate to and follow up on. It first provides an Earth diagnosis of current and projected human-induced environmental change, by putting facts and interlinkages in perspective, including by using smart infographics. In building on this diagnosis, the report identifies the shifts needed to close gaps between current actions and those needed to achieve sustainable development.

The analysis is anchored in current economic, social and ecological reality and framed by economics and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. By synthesising the latest scientific findings from the global environmental assessments, the report communicates the current status of the world’s urgent issues and opportunities to solve them.

Making peace with nature (apo.org.au)

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2. Australian scientists warn urgent action needed to save 19 ‘collapsing’ ecosystems

A ‘confronting and sobering’ report details degradation of coral reefs, outback deserts, tropical savanna, Murray-Darling waterways, mangroves and forests

https://theconversation.com/existential-threat-to-our-survival-see-the-19-australian-ecosystems-already-collapsing-154077
and
Australian scientists warn urgent action needed to save 19 ‘collapsing’ ecosystems | Conservation | The Guardian

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3. Climate Change is Weakening the Ocean Currents That Shape Weather on Both Sides of the Atlantic

The change in the main ocean heat pump could bring more heat waves to Europe, increase sea level rise in North America and force fish to move farther north.

Climate Change is Weakening the Ocean Currents That Shape Weather on Both Sides of the Atlantic – Inside Climate News

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4. How Australia began dealing with this thing called ‘the Environment’?

A
toe in the water: Australia gets its first Federal environment minister (1971) and the world comes together in Stockholm (1972)

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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5. Let’s talk about standards for scholarly opinion articles

I’ve written a lot of posts here about how frustrating it is to try and publish conceptual or expert opinion-style articles in peer reviewed journals. Most journals have very few standards for this article category, and peer reviewers often don’t seem to have the guidance to know how to review them fairly.

Let’s talk about standards for scholarly opinion articles – Ecology is not a dirty word

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6. What Scientists Have Learned from 100 Years of Bird Banding

A rich archive of data has illuminated the secret lives of birds

What Scientists Have Learned from 100 Years of Bird Banding – Scientific American

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7. The world’s forgotten fishes: Freshwater fish in ‘catastrophic’ decline

Freshwater fishes are dazzlingly diverse. And they are critical for societies, economies & ecosystems…but they are undervalued and under threat.

https://europe.nxtbook.com/nxteu/wwfintl/freshwater_fishes_report/index.php#/p/1

and see

Extinction: Freshwater fish in ‘catastrophic’ decline
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-56160756

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. ‘D’ stands for ‘Decision’ and refers to all the ingredients that go into good, fair and just decision-making in relation to the environment.

From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


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