Dbytes #466 (10 March 2021)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“It’s official. 34 mammal species have been lost from Australia and as these species are found nowhere else, we’ve also lost them from the planet and from all of time. There’s not another country, rich or poor, that has anything like this record.”
Suzanne Milthorpe, the Wilderness Society
[and see item 2 & 5]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Online survey: the future of (open-source) acoustic monitoring technology
2. Minister signs extinction certificates for 13 species
3. Re-conceptualizing the role(s) of science in biodiversity conservation
4. Revisiting Biodiversity Research and Action
5. How good is Australia?!!
6. Minister Ley to face legal challenge on refusal to grant access to documents about controversial ‘fast tracked’ projects
7. Vast majority of sharks caught in Great Barrier Reef drum lines died, despite tribunal’s orders

-~<>~-

1. Online survey: the future of (open-source) acoustic monitoring technology

Interested in acoustic monitoring of biodiversity and natural environments? We want to hear from you!

I’m José Lahoz-Monfort, researcher at the University of Melbourne and president of the Conservation Technology Working Group of the Society for Conservation Biology. We are conducting a short online survey (about 10 minutes) to understand the future needs of acoustic monitoring technology applied to the study of biodiversity in terrestrial and aquatic environments. By participating in this survey, you will be contributing to the development of a roadmap for acoustic monitoring technology, a publicly available document to support strategic and long-term planning of future open-source acoustic devices. We also aim to understand how willing people are to learn about open-source hardware and associated software to be able to customize their equipment.
Please pass along this survey to anyone who may be interested. We aim to get as many respondents as possible from all over the planet to better reflect the technology needs of the bio/ecoacoustics community. We’re particularly keen to hear the voice of those often underrepresented (e.g. Africa, South & Central America, Asia).
The survey will close on Friday 26th of March, and we’ll present the summarised results in this Wildlabs page. Take the survey: your needs and priorities for (open-source) acoustic monitoring technology | WILDLABS.NET

http://survey.alchemer.eu/s3/90316767/OpenSourceAcousticDevices

-~<>~-

2. Minister signs extinction certificates for 13 species

This latest update cements Australia’s reputation as the mammal extinction capital of the world with 34 extinct mammal species. The next nearest nation is Haiti with 9 extinct mammal species.

Minister signs extinction certificates for 13… | Wilderness Society
 and see
Australia confirms extinction of 13 more species, including first reptile since colonisation | Extinct wildlife | The Guardian

-~<>~-

3. Re-conceptualizing the role(s) of science in biodiversity conservation

Megan Evans reviewed the literature, found 10 existing reviews of conservation science, and found that although the diversification of ideas and frames predicted by Mace in 2014 was collectively apparent, review authors typically didn’t explicitly acknowledge the existence of multiple conservation goals or worldviews. There was also a lack of clarity over the role(s) of science. She includes a framework and some definitions in her paper to help clarify things in future.

Her take home message is, let’s take the time to think and reflect on the assumptions and worldviews we each bring to our work, and to seek to understand those of others. This can help to “open up” new pathways and roles for science in biodiversity conservation, and clarify pathways and roles for other actors, institutions and knowledges. Also, there’s space for everyone and their ideas and conceptualisations of science and conservation. So the next time you read a paper saying, for example, that scientists “should” or “shouldn’t” engage in protests, or “the” goal of conservation is X, please refer to her paper.

Re-conceptualizing the role(s) of science in biodiversity conservation | Environmental Conservation | Cambridge Core

-~<>~-

4. Revisiting Biodiversity Research and Action

Addressing interconnected challenges of environmental degradation and social justice requires revisiting the foundations of biodiversity research and action.

Revisiting Biodiversity Research and Action | Ideas for Sustainability (wordpress.com)

-~<>~-

5. How good is Australia?!!
How deep have we stuck our head in the sand when it comes to the environment?

Given our sad record of environmental decline and wretched environmental stewardship, our repeated and growing failure to protect those natural values we told ourselves and the world we would look after, the assertion that Australia is ‘good’ borders on the obscene; and yet it constantly goes unchallenged.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

-~<>~-

6. Minister Ley to face legal challenge on refusal to grant access to documents about controversial ‘fast tracked’ projects

The Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) will today file a case at the Administrative Appeals Tribunal (AAT) challenging Environment Minister Sussan Ley’s refusal to release documents requested under Freedom of Information laws about 15 ‘fast tracked’ environmental approvals. ACF’s case will challenge the Government’s use of ‘national cabinet’ exemptions to avoid FOI disclosures. Legal advice obtained by ACF last year found it was not clear whether or not national cabinet documents would automatically attract the cabinet exemption.

Minister Ley to face legal challenge on refusal to grant access to documents about controversial ‘fast tracked’ projects – Australian Conservation Foundation (acf.org.au)

-~<>~-

7. Vast majority of sharks caught in Great Barrier Reef drum lines died, despite tribunal’s orders

Humane Society International, which won legal action against Queensland government last year, says 80% of sharks caught are still dying

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/mar/09/vast-majority-of-sharks-caught-in-great-barrier-reef-drum-lines-died-despite-tribunals-orders?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. ‘D’ stands for ‘Decision’ and refers to all the ingredients that go into good, fair and just decision-making in relation to the environment.

From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s