Dbytes #468 (24 March 2021)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“Australia is widely viewed as an international climate laggard. In the 2020 Climate Change Performance Index, it received the lowest rating of 57 countries and the European Union. It also ranked second-worst on climate action, out of 177 countries, in the 2020 UN Sustainable Development Report.”
Lesley Hughes et al, in The Conversation
[see item 4]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Standards and Assurance) Bill 2021: What you need to know
2. Only the lonely: an endangered bird is forgetting its song as the species dies out
3. Why ‘technology, not taxes’ is such a bad idea
4. Wake up, Mr Morrison: Australia’s slack climate effort leaves our children 10 times more work to do
5. Australian climate politics from the outside in
6. We don’t know how extreme fire impacts Australian invertebrates
7. Bottom trawling releases as much carbon as air travel, landmark study finds

-~<>~-

1. Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Standards and Assurance) Bill 2021: What you need to know

The government has completely ignored a central thesis of the Samuel report – that standards should define environmental outcomes, not simply dictate process. To demonstrate it in simple terms, an outcome-oriented national environmental standard for threatened species would say critical habitats must be defined, identified and protected. A process-type standard would simply say critical habitats would need to be accounted for in any assessment of impacts. They may sound similar, but they clearly mean very different things.

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment (Standards and Assurance) Bill 2021: What you need to know – Australian Conservation Foundation (acf.org.au)

-~<>~-

2. Only the lonely: an endangered bird is forgetting its song as the species dies out

Just as humans learn languages, animals learn behaviours crucial for survival and reproduction from older, experienced individuals of the same species. In this way, important “cultures” such as bird songs are passed from one generation to the next. But global biodiversity loss means many animal populations are becoming small and sparsely distributed. This jeopardises the ability of young animals to learn important behaviours.

https://theconversation.com/only-the-lonely-an-endangered-bird-is-forgetting-its-song-as-the-species-dies-out-156950

-~<>~-

3. Why ‘technology, not taxes’ is such a bad idea

It’s a morally bankrupt and false argument on so many levels. A thin tissue of obfuscation, lies and smoke designed to kick the can down the road.

From the promise of technology to the ‘tragedy of the commons’

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

-~<>~-

4. Wake up, Mr Morrison: Australia’s slack climate effort leaves our children 10 times more work to do

Our report, released today, pinpoints the emissions reduction burden Australians will bear in future decades if our Paris targets are not increased. Alarmingly, people living in the 2030s and 2040s could be forced to reduce emissions by ten times as much as people this decade, if Australia is to keep within its 2℃ “carbon budget”.

https://theconversation.com/wake-up-mr-morrison-australias-slack-climate-effort-leaves-our-children-10-times-more-work-to-do-157136

-~<>~-

5. Australian climate politics from the outside in

For over ten years – as I progressed from student, to activist, to public servant and back to student – I have watched powerful people shred my future while feeling increasingly desperate to understand why effective climate change action seems impossible. Only since September 2020, however, have I been divorced from the toxic environment of Australian climate politics and policy. Marooned in the UK, watching UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson bumble his way toward hosting COP26 in Glasgow later this year, I have realised that when it comes to climate change, Australia is not like other countries.

Australian climate politics from the outside in (thefifthestate.com.au)

-~<>~-

6. We don’t know how extreme fire impacts Australian invertebrates

After last year’s catastrophic megafires, the world’s attention rightly turned to the devastating impacts on our ecosystems and wildlife. We present an evidence-based perspective to show how invertebrates, and the ecosystems they support, face major threats as fire severity and frequency intensifies in response to global climate change. Our capacity to make effective decisions about ecosystem recovery and restoration funding after bushfires is hampered by the lack of knowledge on how invertebrates are impacted by fire, directly and indirectly, and how invertebrate communities influence ecosystem recovery.

New paper: we don’t know how extreme fire impacts Australian invertebrates – Ecology is not a dirty word

-~<>~-

7. Bottom trawling releases as much carbon as air travel, landmark study finds

Dragging heavy nets across seabed disturbs marine sediments, world’s largest carbon sink, scientists report.

Bottom trawling releases as much carbon as air travel, landmark study finds | Marine life | The Guardian

-~<>~-

About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. ‘D’ stands for ‘Decision’ and refers to all the ingredients that go into good, fair and just decision-making in relation to the environment.

From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s