Dbytes #485 (21 July 2021)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making

“A key challenge is getting acceptance in society that protecting natural capital is a higher priority than achieving economic growth.”
Michael Vardon et al [see item 3]


In this issue of Dbytes

1. A New Global Framework for Managing Nature Through 2030
2. The blue carbon wealth of nations
3. From natural capital accounting to natural capital banking
4. Forget charisma, save our insects!
5. Artificial refuges for wildlife conservation: what is the state of the science?
6. Repeating mistakes: why the plan to protect the world’s wildlife falls short
7. New research reveals how Australia and other nations play politics with World Heritage sites

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1. A New Global Framework for Managing Nature Through 2030

The Secretariat of the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) has released the first draft of a new global biodiversity framework, to guide actions worldwide through 2030, to preserve and protect nature and its essential services to people.

https://www.cbd.int/article/draft-1-global-biodiversity-framework

[and see item 6]

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2. The blue carbon wealth of nations

Carbon sequestration and storage in mangroves, salt marshes and seagrass meadows is an essential coastal ‘blue carbon’ ecosystem service for climate change mitigation. Here we offer a comprehensive, global and spatially explicit economic assessment of carbon sequestration and storage in three coastal ecosystem types at the global and national levels. We propose a new approach based on the country-specific social cost of carbon that allows us to calculate each country’s contribution to, and redistribution of, global blue carbon wealth. Globally, coastal ecosystems contribute a mean ± s.e.m. of US$190.67 ± 30 bn yr−1 to blue carbon wealth. The three countries generating the largest positive net blue wealth contribution for other countries are Australia, Indonesia and Cuba, with Australia alone generating a positive net benefit of US$22.8 ± 3.8 bn yr−1 for the rest of the world through coastal ecosystem carbon sequestration and storage in its territory.

The blue carbon wealth of nations | Nature Climate Change

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3. From natural capital accounting to natural capital banking

Natural capital accounting will confirm what we know — without change, we are headed for environmental disaster resulting from economic growth. We propose a natural capital bank, a new institution to help maintain natural capital adequacy and chart a course to a sustainable future via accounting.
From natural capital accounting to natural capital banking | Nature Sustainability
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4. Forget charisma, save our insects!

Never underestimate the politics swirling around charismatic megafauna because they always get the biggest chunk of the tiny conservation pie. Sadly it’s a powerful political reflex.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/

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5. Artificial refuges for wildlife conservation: what is the state of the science?

Artificial refuges are used across the globe to mitigate the impacts of a variety of threats on wildlife, such as habitat loss and degradation. However, there is little understanding of the science underpinning artificial refuges, and what comprises best practice for artificial refuge design and implementation for wildlife conservation. We address this gap by undertaking a systematic review of the current state of artificial refuge research for the conservation of wildlife.

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/brv.12776

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6. Repeating mistakes: why the plan to protect the world’s wildlife falls short

This week the UN’s Convention on Biological Diversity released a draft of its newest ten-year global plan. Often considered to be the Paris Agreement of biodiversity, the new plan aims to galvanise planetary scale action to achieve a world “living in harmony with nature” by 2050. But if the plan goes ahead in its current form, it will fall short in safeguarding the wonder of our natural world. This is primarily because it doesn’t legally bind nations to it, risking the same mistakes made by the last ten-year plan, which didn’t stop biodiversity decline.

https://theconversation.com/repeating-mistakes-why-the-plan-to-protect-the-worlds-wildlife-falls-short-164497

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7. New research reveals how Australia and other nations play politics with World Heritage sites

Some places are considered so special they’re valuable to all humanity and must be preserved for future generations. These irreplaceable gems – such as Machu Picchu, Stonehenge, Yosemite National Park and the Great Barrier Reef – are known as World Heritage sites. When these places are threatened, they can officially be placed on the “List of World Heritage in Danger”. This action brings global attention to the natural or human causes of the threats. It can encourage emergency conservation action and mobilise international assistance. However, our research released today shows the process of In Danger listings is being manipulated for political gain. National governments and other groups try to keep sites off the list, with strategies such as lobbying, or partial efforts to protect a site. Australian government actions to keep the Great Barrier Reef off the list are a prime example.

https://theconversation.com/new-research-reveals-how-australia-and-other-nations-play-politics-with-world-heritage-sites-142918

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. ‘D’ stands for ‘Decision’ and refers to all the ingredients that go into good, fair and just decision-making in relation to the environment.

From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords).

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

Anyone is welcome to receive Dbytes. If you would like to receive it, send me an email and I’ll add you to the list.

David


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