Dbytes #529 (21 June 2022)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


“These narratives show how the climate conversation has moved from outright climate denialism to delayism and distraction from acting. As these narratives infiltrate general discourse, stances on climate actions are entrenching into broader individual identity and grievance politics, emerging as a new front in the culture wars.”
Jennie King et al, 2022 [see item 7]

In this issue of Dbytes

1. No excuses’: limited conservation efforts could save at least 47 Australian animals from extinction
2. Why can’t we fix this? Because it’s complex
3. Flexible conservation decisions for climate adaptation
4. Australian frogs are dying en masse again, and we need your help to find out why
5. The Potential of Blue Carbon for Mitigating Climate Change
6. IIED: 50 years of communicating about environment and development
7. Deny, Deceive, Delay: Documenting and Responding to Climate Disinformation at COP26 & Beyond

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1. No excuses’: limited conservation efforts could save at least 47 Australian animals from extinction

Scientists hope Albanese government addresses extinction crisis as new research shows 63 vertebrates face annihilation by 2041.

‘No excuses’: limited conservation efforts could save at least 47 Australian animals from extinction | Endangered species | The Guardian

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2. Why can’t we fix this? Because it’s complex

Don’t treat climate change as a simple problem. It’s not. It’s complex, and it won’t be solved with simple solutions. If you’re in any doubt about this, have a look at what’s happened over the last two decades.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/2022/06/21/why-cant-we-fix-this-because-its-complex/

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3. Flexible conservation decisions for climate adaptation

We need to think more strategically about building flexibility into conservation decision-making and planning for climate adaptation. We characterise flexible conservation strategies into three types of flexibility (procedural, action, and resource flexibility) and use structured decision-making to link flexible strategies to particular types of risks arising from climate uncertainty. We hope that this will provide a framework for organisations and governments to be able to think more strategically about how to build flexibility into conservation plans and identifying when flexibility is likely to be valuable.

https://authors.elsevier.com/a/1fG9j9C%7EItyLNS

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4. Australian frogs are dying en masse again, and we need your help to find out why

Last winter, thousands of dead and dying frogs were found across Australia. Instead of hunkering down and out of sight, frogs were spotted during the day in the open, on footpaths, highways and doorsteps – often in the blazing sun. These frogs were often thin, slow moving, and with dark patches on their back or red bellies. They were seeking water in pet bowls or pot plants. And they usually died in a matter of hours. A crash in frog populations could have very real consequences, particularly for already threatened frog species, and the importance of frogs in both freshwater and land systems means it can also impact entire ecosystems. Thankfully, reports of sick or dead frogs slowed as the weather got warmer, and by the end of last year they had all but ceased. We hoped the awful spate of frog deaths was a one-off. But now, we fear it is happening again.

Australian frogs are dying en masse again, and we need your help to find out why (theconversation.com)

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5. The Potential of Blue Carbon for Mitigating Climate Change

The latest McKinsey & Company report, “Blue Carbon: The potential of coastal and economic climate action,” accentuates the importance of blue carbon. It highlights how nature-based climate solutions in the world’s oceans can play an important role in conservation and carbon reduction efforts worldwide.

The Potential of Blue Carbon for Mitigating Climate Change – Impakter

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6. IIED: 50 years of communicating about environment and development

We have an operating budget of around 7% of IIED’s income for central comms. I believe this to be a good benchmark that provides value for money and a sensible approach to making sure you have enough resource, but not too much. It allows us to provide a robust ‘standing capacity’ for essential comms activities that keep the organisation competitive, visible in the right spaces, and able to produce high-impact material.

IIED: 50 years of communicating about environment and development – Research to Action

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7. Deny, Deceive, Delay: Documenting and Responding to Climate Disinformation at COP26 & Beyond

A new report by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue tracks the way calls for inaction on climate have evolved from the rhetoric of outright denial towards a focus on delaying action and under-stating risks. It finds that misinformation spread by a relatively small circle of actors is amplified rather than mitigated by both mainstream and social media. It brings forward seven policy recommendations to change this dynamic.

Deny, Deceive, Delay: Documenting and Responding to Climate Disinformation at COP26 & Beyond – Summary – ISD (isdglobal.org)

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. ‘D’ stands for ‘Decision’ and refers to all the ingredients that go into good, fair and just decision-making in relation to the environment. From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords). Dbytes is supported by the Global Water Forum.

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

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David Salt
and you can follow me on twitter at
@davidlimesalt

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