Dbytes #531 (6 July 2022)

Info, news & views for anyone interested in biodiversity conservation and good environmental decision making


“We found nature restoration only marginally lowers global warming – and any climate benefits are dwarfed by the scale of ongoing fossil fuel emissions, which could be over 2,000 billion tonnes of CO₂ between now and 2100, under current policies.”
Kate Dooley & Zebedee Nicholls [see item 1]

In this issue of Dbytes

1. No more excuses: restoring nature is not a silver bullet for global warming, we must cut emissions outright
2. Scientists warn deal to save biodiversity is in jeopardy
3. Solving sustainability – It’s complicated AND complex. Do you know the difference?
4. A call on conferences for more equity and inclusion of diversity
5. We blew the whistle on Australia’s central climate policy. Here’s what a new federal government probe must fix
6. Conservation Science Publishing Has a Gender Problem
7. Enormous environmental consequences of the war in Ukraine


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1. No more excuses: restoring nature is not a silver bullet for global warming, we must cut emissions outright

Restoring degraded environments, such as by planting trees, is often touted as a solution to the climate crisis. But our new research shows this, while important, is no substitute for preventing fossil fuel emissions to limit global warming.

https://theconversation.com/no-more-excuses-restoring-nature-is-not-a-silver-bullet-for-global-warming-we-must-cut-emissions-outright-186048?

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2. Scientists warn deal to save biodiversity is in jeopardy

Negotiators from around 200 countries that have signed up to the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) met in Nairobi from 21 to 26 June to thrash out key details of the deal, known as the post-2020 global biodiversity framework. But the talks made such little progress that many scientists are worried that nations will be unable to finalize the deal at the UN biodiversity summit in Montreal, Canada, in December. A key sticking point is how much funding rich nations will provide to low-income nations. Failure to agree on the framework at this summit — the 15th meeting of the Conference of the Parties (COP15) — will be devastating for the natural world, they say.


Scientists warn deal to save biodiversity is in jeopardy (nature.com)

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3. Solving sustainability – It’s complicated AND complex. Do you know the difference?

Why is climate change so difficult to solve? Because it’s a complex problem and complexity is something humans don’t deal with well. Our political leaders will tell you they are in control, and that they have a plan, a simple solution that solves the problem of climate change without anyone having to change. Simple solutions never solve complex problems but they can make them worse.

https://sustainabilitybites.home.blog/2022/07/05/solving-sustainability-its-complicated-and-complex-do-you-know-the-difference/

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4. A call on conferences for more equity and inclusion of diversity

This blog post is dedicated to all the people who care about equity and inclusion of diversity, especially with regards to collaborations with researchers and practitioners from low, lower-middle, and upper-middle income economy countries. Here, I tell my personal backstory about how the largest, oldest, and most respected coral reef research society, the International Coral Reef Society (ICRS), changed their operational model for running their International Coral Reef Symposium (ICRS22) to improve participation and access to delegates from developing countries by waiving the online registration fees. This change must have followed years of conversations and more recently, a public letter by a very unhappy symposium chair. Me.

A call on conferences for more equity and inclusion of diversity | Elisa’s fabulous blog (elisabayra.github.io)

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5. We blew the whistle on Australia’s central climate policy. Here’s what a new federal government probe must fix

Our analysis suggests up to 80% of credits issued under three of the Emissions Reduction Fund’s most popular emissions reduction methods do not represent genuine emissions cuts that wouldn’t have happened otherwise. Our decision to call the scheme a “fraud” was deliberate and considered. In our view, a process that systematically pays for a service that’s not actually provided is fraudulent. The Clean Energy Regulator (which administers the fund) and the current ERAC reviewed our claims and, earlier this month, dismissed them. We have expressed serious concerns with that review process, which we believe was not transparent and showed a fundamental lack of understanding of the issues.

https://theconversation.com/we-blew-the-whistle-on-australias-central-climate-policy-heres-what-a-new-federal-government-probe-must-fix-185894?

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6. Conservation Science Publishing Has a Gender Problem

The persistent gender gap in science publishing is harming conservation efforts. An analysis of papers published by Nature Conservancy scientists over 50 years finds that men continue to out-publish women. Only 36% of authors were women, and in any year women in the Global South have never comprised more than 3% of total authorships across the organization.

Conservation Science Publishing Has a Gender Problem (nature.org)

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7. Enormous environmental consequences of the war in Ukraine

The conflict in Ukraine is destroying environments and not only in the war zone.

Environment: Enormous environmental consequences of the war in Ukraine (johnmenadue.com)

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About Dbytes

Dbytes is a weekly eNewsletter presenting news and views on biodiversity conservation and environmental decision science. ‘D’ stands for ‘Decision’ and refers to all the ingredients that go into good, fair and just decision-making in relation to the environment.

From 2007-2018 Dbytes was supported by a variety of research networks and primarily the Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED). From 2019 Dbytes is being produced by David Salt (Ywords). Dbytes is supported by the Global Water Forum.

If you have any contributions to Dbytes (ie, opportunities and resources that you think might think be of value to other Dbyte readers) please send them to David.Salt@anu.edu.au. Please keep them short and provide a link for more info.

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David Salt
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@davidlimesalt

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